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November events include Shakespeare, writers, music, films and more

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2010-10-29

Campus programs open to the public

SPARTANBURG, S.C.
– Wofford College will present a number of arts and cultural events during November that are open to the public, most free of charge.

For information, contact Laura Corbin, laura.corbin@wofford.edu or 864-597-4180, or the contact indicated for the individual events.

Symposium on the Graphic Novel: A discussion with Roy Thomas
Tuesday, Nov. 2 – 4 p.m., McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building
Roy Thomas, former editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics, is a comics historian and prolific writer. He is best known for his work on “Conan the Barbarian,” “Justice Society of America,” “X-Men” and “Avengers.” Thomas is editor of “Alter Ego” magazine. Description of the Symposium: While it could be argued that the origins of the graphic novel reach back to cave paintings, writers and publishers of the medium first adopted the term in 1976-78 to distinguish longer-form monographs from traditional comic books. Since then, these works have increased markedly in number and critical acceptance. Today, the term “graphic novel” can refer to a variety of works that combine the visual arts with the written word, ranging from original stories in graphic form to collections of previously published comics. This series of discussions explores the common theme of identity.

World Film Series: “Los Abrazos Rotos” (“Broken Embraces”)
Wednesday, Nov. 3 – 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building
Director: Pedro Almodovar
Spain, 2009. 128 minutes. In Spanish with English subtitles
Aging filmmaker Mateo Blanco – aka screenwriter Harry Caine – tells his assistant about life before the accident that left him blind, when he became embroiled in a torrid affair with aspiring actress Lena. Harry’s story involves his agent, Judit, and deceitful financier Ernesto Martel. A film about passion, obsession, wealth, jealousy and guilt, Pedro Almodovar writes and directs this colorful, romantic and tragic thriller that was nominated for a Golden Globe.

Guest speaker: “Behind the Silver Platters of the Dutch Golden Age”
Julie Berger Hochstrasser, speaker
Wednesday, Nov. 3 – 8 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Julie Berger Hochstrasser earned her B.A. degree with distinction in history of art from Swarthmore College. She completed her M.A. in Renaissance art and her Ph.D. in baroque, specializing in 17th century Dutch painting, at the University of California Berkeley. She has held fellowships from Fulbright to the Netherlands, the Center for Advance Studies in Visual Arts in Washington, D.C., and the American Council for Learned Societies as Burkhardt Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. Her teaching addresses history and techniques of Dutch and Flemish painting, history of the print, and global issues in visual culture with special regard to Dutch colonial history. She is the author of “Still Life and Trade in the Dutch Golden Age” (Yale University Press, 2007) and articles on topics ranging from still life and landscape to the impact of Dutch visual culture throughout the world in numerous anthologies.

Exhibit: Ceramic Works by Akilah Bostick
Thursday, Nov. 4, through Wednesday, Dec. 15, Martha Cloud Chapman Gallery, Campus Life Building
Artist Reception – Thursday, Nov. 4, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
The Whetsell Fellowship enables a Wofford student to study in the summer some aspect of the visual arts, with the study leading to an exhibition on the campus during the academic year. The 2010 Whetsell Fellow, Akilah Bostick, spent the summer working with Spartanburg area artist Amy Goldstein-Rice to translate previous two-dimensional works on the human form into ceramic pieces.

Exhibit: “Walls and Windows, Signs and Symbols”
Friday, Nov. 5, through Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011, Glass Case Galleries, Roger Milliken Science Center
New photographs by Peter L. Schmunk, professor and chair of fine arts

Exhibit: Robicsek Collection of 17th Century Dutch Paintings
Saturday, Nov. 6, through Wednesday, Dec. 15, Sandor Teszler Library Gallery

Noted Charlotte, N.C., heart surgeon and collector Dr. Francis Robicsek is lending a superb collection of paintings by 17th century Dutch masters for exhibition.

Symposium on the Graphic Novel: V for Vendetta: Fascism, Anarchy and Identity
Tuesday, Nov. 9 – 4 p.m., McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building
This discussion will explore the politics of Alan Moore’s and David Lloyd’s dystopic view of a near-future England and the parallels between V’s terrorist attacks on London and his destruction and rebuilding of his apprentice Eve. The discussion will be led by Wofford instructor Christopher Dinkins. Description of the Symposium: While it could be argued that the origins of the graphic novel reach back to cave paintings, writers and publishers of the medium first adopted the term in 1976-78 to distinguish longer-form monographs from traditional comic books. Since then, these works have increased markedly in number and critical acceptance. Today, the term “graphic novel” can refer to a variety of works that combine the visual arts with the written word, ranging from original stories in graphic form to collections of previously published comics. This series of discussions explores the common theme of identity.

Guest speaker: Former U.S. Rep. Glen Browder (Ala.) on Southern Politics
Tuesday, Nov. 9 – 7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
A South Carolina native and former U.S. congressman from Alabama, Glen Browder is the author of two recent books, “Stealth Reconstruction” and “The South’s New Racial Politics.” Browder’s books have been called “provocative, insightful and brutally candid – but never dull” and provide a new interpretation of recent Southern politics and history.

Guest speaker: 4th Circuit Solicitor Trey Gowdy, candidate for 4th Congressional District representative
Wednesday, Nov. 10 – 7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium

Wofford College Republicans will host Solicitor Trey Gowdy, candidate for the U.S. representative in South Carolina’s 4th Congressional District.

Faculty Concert: A Four-Hand Salute to Veterans Day
Thursday, Nov. 11 – 7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Gary McCraw, associate professor and director of music, and Christi Sellars, music instructor, will present a “four-hand” (duet) patriotic program for Veterans Day, including such compositions as “My Country ’Tis of Thee,” “America,” “Concerto Americana,” and “Stars and Stripes Forever” and “Washington Post March” by John Philip Sousa. Also included will be the “Armed Forces Medley” and “God Bless America.”

Writers Series: Judith Ortiz Cofer, poet
Thursday, Nov. 11 – 7:30 p.m., Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building
Judith Ortiz Cofer is one of a number of Latina writers who rose to prominence during the 1980s and 1990s. Her stories about coming-of-age experiences in Puerto Rican communities outside New York City and her poems and essays about cultural conflicts of immigrants to the U.S. mainland have made Ortiz Cofer a leading literary interpreter of the U.S.-Puerto Rican experience. Since 1984, she has been on the faculty at the University of Georgia, where she is the Regents’ and Franklin Professor of English and Creative Writing. This year, she was inducted into the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame.

Wofford Theatre: The American Shakespeare Center Presents
“Macbeth” – Sunday, Nov. 14 – 8 p.m.
“As You Like It” – Monday, Nov. 15 – 8 p.m.
Both performances in Tony White Theater, Campus Life Building

After 2009’s amazing one-night performance of “The Knight of the Burning Pestle,” the American Shakespeare Center returns with two phenomenal productions of two Shakespearean Classics. The ASC is considered one of the best professional Shakespeare repertory companies in the country.
Special pricing: Each show is $12 per person ($6 for students), but you may see both shows for $20 ($10 for students). For reservations, call 864-597-4080.

Wofford African / African American Studies Program Speaker Series
Joe Winters, speaker
Thursday, Nov. 18 – 4 p.m., Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

Joseph Winters received his B.A. from Harvard College, his M.T.S. form Duke University and his Ph.D. from Princeton University. He joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 2009. Winters teaches courses in religion and modern culture, Africana studies, and critical theory. His current research project is on the theme of mourning in Theodore Adorno and Toni Morrison works.

Troubadour Series: Patrick Lui, guitar
Friday, Nov. 19 – 4 p.m., Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
An artist with a reputation for embodying both depth and precision in his playing, guitarist Patrick Lui has established himself as both a notable performer and a gifted teacher. He has degrees from the North Carolina School of the Arts and Arizona State University and has attended the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts. Lui has dedicated himself to the education of young guitarists and currently teaches at Weaver Academy for Performance and Visual Arts in Greensboro, N.C. For more information, go to his Web site at www.patrickluiguitar.com.

Foothills Civil War Roundtable: “Newspaper Images of Charleston”
Monday, Nov. 22 – 6-8 p.m., Montgomery Room, Burwell Building
Doug Bostick, speaker
Dinner and program are $15 per person. RSVP to Juanita Pesaro at pesarojb@wofford.edu or 864-597-4207.

Exhibit: Works by Mary Shand
Permanent Collection Display, Anna Todd Wofford Center, Andrews Field House
Works by Mary Shand, a painter who worked in the Washington, D.C., area