Professor giving a lecture to students in old main

September events at Wofford

Topping out celebrations for two new buildings highlight month

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A Topping Out Celebration for the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts, above, will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13, while a similar event will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27, for the Jerry Richardson Indoor Stadium.
2016-09-06

SPARTANBURG, S.C. – Two new buildings at Wofford College – the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts and the Jerry Richardson Indoor Stadium – will be celebrated with topping out event during September. The events, Sept. 13 and Sept. 27, respectively, are the highlights of the month’s events on campus. Other events include musical performances, guest lectures and art exhibitions.

All events are open to the public and are free of charge unless otherwise noted. Please check the online calendar at calendar.wofford.edu for frequent updates. For athletics events, please go to athletics.wofford.edu.

For more information, contact Laura Corbin at woffordnews@wofford.edu or 864-597-4180.

Tuesday, Sept. 13
Topping Out Celebration, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
11 a.m., construction site

The topping out celebration for the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts will honor Jerry and Rosalind Richardson, the construction teams on the project and the economic impact of the project. The Wofford community will have the opportunity to sign a construction beam that will be placed in the building. A campus lunch will follow on the lawn.

Thursday, Sept. 15
Hispanic Heritage Month: “Tres Vidas,” a musical performance
7-8:15 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

The Core Ensemble will perform the chamber music theater work “Tres Vidas.” Chamber music theater is a unique performance format developed by the Core Ensemble featuring a marriage of theatrical narrative and chamber music performance. Francisca Munoz portrays multiple characters while interacting with the on-stage musical trio of cello, piano and percussion. “Tres Vidas” celebrates the life, times and work of three significant Latin and South American women: painter Frida Kahlo of Mexico, peasant activist Rufina Amaya of El Salvador and poet Alfonsina Storni of Argentina. With storylines including Kahlo’s dramatic and passionate relationship with painter Diego Rivera, Amaya’s astounding singular survival of the massacre at El Mozote and Storni’s lifelong challenges as Argentina’s first great feminist poet, “Tres Vidas” presents dramatic situations timeless in their emotional appeal and connection to audiences across all gender and ethnic spectrums. The event is funded by Wofford’s Cultural Affairs Committee and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Friday, Sept. 16
Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival
5-7 p.m., The Pavilion

The Mid-Autumn Festival, or Moon Festival, is the second-most important traditional holiday in China after Chinese New Year. The festival allows the Chinese people to celebrate the autumn harvest and to enjoy a full moon with family and friends. It is celebrated on Aug. 15 in the Chinese lunar calendar. The event will feature Chinese food, moon cake, fruits, games and crafting activities.

Tuesday, Sept. 20
Guest Lecture: Mark Mazzetti, New York Times correspondent; “The Shadow War: The Secret Post-9/11 Conflicts and the World the Next President Will Inherit”
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Mark Mazzetti is a correspondent for the New York Times, where he has covered national security from the newspaper’s Washington bureau since April 2006. He is the author of “The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and a War at the Ends of the Earth.” In 2009, he shared a Pulitzer Prize for reporting on the intensifying violence in Pakistan and Afghanistan and Washington’s response. The previous year, he was a Pulitzer finalist for reporting on the CIA’s detention and interrogation program.

Thursday, Sept. 22
Hispanic Heritage Month: Celebration Kickoff
5-7 p.m., Burwell Dining Hall, Burwell Building

Guests are invited to participate in an enriching cultural experience that will feature various dishes from Latin America.

Thursday, Sept. 22
Kappa Delta Sorority’s 4th Annual Shamrock ’N’ Shuck
5-8 p.m., The Pavilion

The sisters of Kappa Delta sorority present their 4th annual Shamrock ’N’ Shuck Oyster Roast. All proceeds will benefit Prevent Child Abuse America and the Hope Center for Children. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased by any Kappa Delta sister.

Thursday, Sept. 22
Dunlap Chamber Music Concert
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

William Preucil, concertmaster of the Cleveland Orchestra, will introduce the Canterbury Quartet, with members of the Cleveland Orchestra and the Vega Quartet, joined by violinist Dr. Eun-Sun Lee, Wofford professor of music and director of the Chamber Players. The evening will be filled with romantic music, featuring Tchaikovsky’s “Souvenir of Florence” and Mendelssohn Octet.

Tuesday, Sept. 27
Topping Out Celebration, Jerry Richardson Indoor Stadium
11 a.m., construction site

The topping out celebration for the Jerry Richardson Indoor Stadium will honor Jerry and Rosalind Richardson, the construction teams and the economic impact of the project. The Wofford community will have the opportunity to sign a construction beam that will be placed in the building. A campus picnic lunch will follow at the construction site on Cumming Street.

Tuesday, Sept. 27
Hispanic Heritage Month: The Latina/o Legacy: Building Our Future
4-5 p.m., Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

What is the Latina/o Legacy in the United States? How do the literary and cultural legacies of Latina/os make the way into books, archives and other important areas of knowledge creation and transmission? As part of the Hispanic Heritage Month, University of Houston professor and Arte Publico editor Dr. Gabriela Baeza Ventura will give an introductory talk about the award-winning Recovery Project, an international effort to locate, preserve and disseminate Hispanic culture of the United States in written form and about the bilingual publishing work of Arte Publico Press as part of that effort.

Tuesday, Sept. 27
Imagine Science Films: The Wofford Tour
7-9 p.m., McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building

The Imagine Science Film Festival in New York City – the first science film festival created by scientists – emphasizes the importance of storytelling, narrative structure and visual communication. Chosen on the basis of both scientific and artistic merit, the annual roster includes genres that run the gamut from fiction and documentaries to experimental films and hybrid forms of “docu-fiction.” The primary goals is to break down stereotypes and defy categorization of the “science film,” and while the festival showcases films whose chief purpose is to convey scientific information with artistry, it also celebrates abstract works designed to capture the magic and “cool” of science and its practitioners.

Wednesday, Sept. 28
Imagine Science Films: The Wofford Tour
7-9 p.m., McMillan Theatre, Campus Life Building

(See description under Tuesday, Sept. 27.)

Thursday, Sept. 29
Opening Reception and Talk: “Cold War Propaganda Posters” exhibition
4-6 p.m., Martha Cloud Chapman Gallery, Campus Life Building

The Martha Cloud Chapman Gallery features the collection of posters that demonstrates the intense ideological conflict of the Cold War. The posters from the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe present communists’ critiques of capitalism with imagery so vivid they do not require translation. The posters also provide clear, contrasting views of who was the aggressor in the conflict, the Soviet Union or the United States/NATO. The time period of the posters, from the 1940s to 1980s, highlights how, although the intensity of the ideological conflict varied throughout the war, it always was present to some degree.

Thursday, Sept. 29
Concert: Kimilee Bryant, actress, singer and former Miss South Carolina
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Kimilee Bryant, an actress, singer and former Miss South Carolina from Berea, is best known for her portrayal of Christine Daae in the Broadway and other productions of “The Phantom of the Opera” and later the role of Carlotta in the same musical. She also has performed at Lincoln Center and worldwide in theatre, opera, television and film. Since 2008, her company, Rubylee Productions, has produced shows for special events and concert series along with new works for the stage. She conducts master classes at universities and fine arts schools nationally and teaches private voice in Greenville.

Thursday, Sept. 29
Imagine Science Films: The Wofford Tour
7-9 p.m., McMillan Theatre, Campus Life Building

(See description under Tuesday, Sept. 27.)

Friday, Sept. 30
Imagine Science Films: The Wofford Tour
7-9 p.m., McMillan Theatre, Campus Life Building

(See description under Tuesday, Sept. 27.)

Gallery Exhibitions:


Through Sept. 30
Photographs by West Summer IV, class of 2015
Sandor Teszler Library Gallery

During the fall of 2015, West Summers IV was a student in the Digital Photography course offered through the studio arts concentration at Wofford. The images in this exhibition were taken by Summers during a class trip to Wofford’s Goodall Environmental Studies Center at Glendale Shoals. They reflect his skill as a photographer, his love of nature and his keen observation of light, color and details that many might overlook.

Through Nov. 4
Cold War Propaganda Posters
Martha Cloud Chapman Gallery, Campus Life Building

See full description above.

Early October events:

Monday, Oct. 3
Dunlap Chamber Music Concert
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

The concert will feature Alexander Kobrin, pianist and winner of the Van Cliburn, Busoni, Chopin and Scottish international competitions, with Wendy Warner, cellist and winner of the Rostropovich international prize, performing Rachmaninoff, Schostakovich and others.

Tuesday, Oct. 4
“Immigration, Christian Faith Communities and Multiculturalism in the U.S. South”
5-7 p.m., Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

The talk explores multiculturalist discourse and practice in predominantly white churches in the U.S. South, where church-based multiculturalism is both reworking and reinforcing existing social relationships. The talk will discuss everyday politics of multiculturalism and the ways in which the boundaries of sameness and difference take shape in non-political spaces.

Tuesday, Oct. 11
Lecture: “Last Night I Dreamt of America”: The United States in the Syrian Imagination
7-8 p.m., Olin Teaching Theatre, Franklin W. Olin Building

This lecture presents one element of a larger project that explores the reach of American “soft power” in the Arab World by analyzing Syrians’ exposure to and perceptions of public diplomacy, Cold War propaganda, Hollywood films, the advertisement and sale of consumer products, and new modes of urban leisure. Drawing upon Syrian mass media, memoirs, samizdat-style journalism and archival collections, as well as American diplomatic correspondence and other primary and secondary sources, this project analyzes Cold War cultural exchange in an understudied but critical setting, and argues that throughout the post-war period the emergent middle classes of Syria’s cities, whatever their nominal political affiliations, were quite receptive to these manifestations of American soft power. The focus of the lecture is American automobiles as symbols and instruments of individual freedom. Thus it analyzes the advertising and sale of automobiles, as well as the cinematic depiction of “car culture” and other forms of mobility in post-WWII Syria, linking these phenomena to public discourses about urban planning, public transportation, safety, order and hygiene, in the context of urbanization and “national” development.

Wednesday, Oct. 12
Guest Lecture: Dr. Kevin Greenwood; “Shadows in the Garden of Perfect Brightness: Imperial Garden and Imperialist Metaphor”
4-5 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Wofford’s Asian Studies Program and the Department of Art and Art History will present a lecture on Chinese Imperial Garden of Perfect Brightness and its metaphor by Dr. Kevin Greenwood. Since its inception in the early 18th century, the vast complex of the Garden of Perfect Brightness, constructed by the Qing imperial court outside Beijing, has engendered varying interpretations. For the Qing emperors, both dominance and esteem could be implied when a part of their empire was encapsulated within the microcosm of the imperial gardens. In the Garden of Perfect Brightness, this cultural appropriation extended from sections evoking Chinese elite literary culture to the lives of farmers, fishermen and merchants, or even to the exotic, faraway lands of Europe. For the colonial powers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the garden was a proxy, burned and looted to humble the recalcitrant Qing court. For 20th century revolutionaries, imperial gardens such as the Garden of Perfect Brightness would symbolize the decadence and mismanagement of the Qing empire, or the inequities of feudal society. Today, some imperial gardens have been restored or recreated as tourist sites, officially examples of the achievements of the workers, craftsmen and architects of the high Qing heyday. However, the immense ruins of the Garden of Perfect Brightness are preserved as a reminder of national humiliation, and references to the garden in film, contemporary art and particularly in international auctions of looted treasures regularly incite nationalistic passion. This lecture will examine these interpretations and discuss the Garden of Perfect Brightness as a floating signifier of opportunity.