SPARTANBURG, S.C. – March events at Wofford College are highlighted by Women’s History Month events, guest lectures and a variety of art exhibitions.

All events listed are open to the public and are free of charge unless otherwise noted. Please check the online calendar at the calendar.wofford.edu for frequent updates. For athletics events, please go to athletics.wofford.edu.

For more information, contact Laura Corbin at woffordnews@wofford.edu or 864-597-4180.

Through Wednesday, March 27
Women’s History Month Event
Homeless Period Project Drive
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion and its partner organizations will collect women’s hygiene products for the Homeless Period Project (HPP), a Greenville-based nonprofit that provides menstrual hygiene products to women and girls in need while educating and advocating to end the stigma of menstruation. Donation receptacles are located in the Wellness Center, the Campus Life Building and residence halls.

Thursday, March 7
“Ecology of a Cracker Childhood: Three Eco-Perspectives”
Panelists: Dr. Peter Brewitt, Dorinda Dallmeyer, Tara Powell
2:30 p.m., Anna Todd Wofford Center, Andrews Field House
Participating in the discussion will be Dr. Peter K. Brewitt, assistant professor of environmental studies at Wofford; geologist, educator and editor Dorinda Dallmeyer; and poet and eco-critic Tara Powell. Brewitt and his colleague Dr. Cynthia T. (Cissy) Fowler, led an Interim course on fire ecology, and Brewitt’s study on dam removal, “Same River Twice,” is due out in April from the Oregon State University Press. Dallmeyer recently retired after 13 years directing the Environmental Ethics Certificate Program at the University of Georgia. She has edited many books on the Southern environment, including “Bartram’s Living Legacy: The Travels and the Nature of the South” from Mercer University Press. Powell teaches in English and Southern studies at the University of South Carolina. Her book, “The Intellectual in Twentieth Century Southern Literature,” is a masterful study of writers, their places and their minds. The panel discussion is a complementary event to the Tyson Family Lecture Series on the Preservation and Restoration of Southern Ecosystems at 7 p.m. by author Janisse Ray.

Thursday, March 7
Tyson Family Lecture Series on the Preservation and Restoration of Southern Ecosystems
“Overstory and Understory: Longleaf Pine for the Long Run”
Guest speaker, author Janisse Ray
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Janisse Ray, author of “Ecology of a Cracker Childhood,” will deliver the Tyson Family Lecture with introductory remarks by Dr. George Tyson, a 1972 Wofford graduate and founder of the Tyson Family Lecture series, and John Lane, a 1977 Wofford graduate and professor and director of Wofford’s Goodall Environmental Studies Center at Glendale, S.C. The Tyson Family Lecture on the Preservation and Restoration of Southern Ecosystems was established in 2012 by Tyson within the purview of the Wofford’s Environmental Studies Program. The annual lectureship is devoted to issues related to the preservation, restoration and sustainability of Southern ecosystems. The speakers reflect the entire range of the multidisciplinary approach of environmental studies and may include individuals from academia, business, industry, government, the arts or the nonprofit sector.

Friday, March 8
Women’s History Month Event
International Women’s Day
11:30 a.m., Burwell Dining Hall
Amnesty International will distribute information about International Women’s Day in front of Burwell Dining Hall to celebrate the rich impact women are making around the world. Sponsored by Amnesty International Wofford College Chapter and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Friday, March 8
Tournées Film Festival
7 p.m., McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building
The Tournées Film Festival will show francophone films over several weeks in partnership with the FACE Foundation. All are on Friday evenings, beginning at 7 p.m. The films being shown are: “Two Days, One Night,” 2014 (Belgium, Italian production), March 8; “Little by Little,” 1971 (Nigerian, French production), March 15; and “Fatma,” 2016 (French, Arabic production), March 22.

Sunday, March 10
Women’s History Month Event
Self-Care Sunday
5:30 p.m., Meadors Multicultural House, Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village
Women on Wofford’s campus will take tie to unwind, making homemade facials and lotions and enjoying a DIY trail mix bar. Students can take a study break and recharge as they discuss the importance of self-care. Sponsored by the Black Student Alliance and Wofford Women of Color.

Tuesday, March 12
Women’s History Month Event
LeadHer Tuesday: Negotiation
11:15 p.m., Conference Room, The Space in the Mungo Center
On Tuesday’s during Women’s History Month, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion will host professional development workshops. Tasha Smith-Tyus, director of career services in The Space in the Mungo Center, will lead a workshop on salary negotiations, discussing why it’s important to negotiate, what’s considered a good job offer and how to articulate what you want. Lunch will be provided to participants. Sponsored by The Space in the Mungo Center and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Tuesday, March 12
Women’s History Month Event
Woman Enough?
6 p.m., McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building
What does it mean to be woman enough? This discussion will center on the impact of societal expectations of women and how those expectations vary among different communities. Sponsored by Wofford Women of Color, Kappa Alpha Theta and the Black Student Alliance.

Tuesday, March 12
Hipp Lecture Series on International Affairs and National Security
“On Service and Sacrifice”
Guest speaker: Former U.S. Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales
8 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Former U.S. Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales will provide the Hipp Lecture, presented by the Hipp Center on National Security and Foreign Policy. Gonzales was appointed attorney general in 2005 by President George W. Bush after after serving four years as White House counsel – the first Hispanic American to hold the post. He was with Bush after he returned to Washington, D.C., on Sept. 11, 2001, as the president began formulating the nation’s response to the terrorist attacks on the country. Gonzales, a graduate of Rice University and Harvard Law School, was a business attorney for 13 years before becoming general counsel to then-Texas Gov. Bush. He then was Texas secretary of state and justice on the Supreme Court of Texas.

Thursday, March 14
Department of History Talk
“The Kremlin Letters: Stalin’s Wartime Correspondence with Roosevelt and Churchill”
Guest speaker: Dr. David Reynolds, Cambridge University
4 p.m., Olin Teaching Theatre, Franklin W. Olin Building
Dr. David Reynolds, professor of international history and a fellow of Christ’s College at Cambridge University, will lecture.

Thursday, March 14
Gallery Talk: “Stoppages”
Speaker: Michael Webster, assistant professor of art and art history
6-8 p.m., Richardson Family Art Gallery, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
Michael Webster, professor in the Department of Art and Art History, will give a gallery talk on his exhibition “Stoppages.” Sculptures in the exhibition are a collection of fragments, contradictions and run-on thoughts about the physical world. The exhibition runs through Saturday, March 30. (See details under Gallery and Museum Exhibitions below.)

Thursday, March 14
Guest Lecture: “Life Lessons Learned from the Triple Crown of Hiking”
Speaker: Jessica “Dixie” Mills, YouTube “superstar” of the backpacking world
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Jessica “Dixie” Mills, a YouTube “superstar” of the backpacking world, will speak on “Life Lessons Learned from the Triple Crown of Hiking,” referencing her recent completion of hikes of the Appalachian Trail, the Pacific Crest Trail and the Continental Divide Trail. A native of Florida, Mills grew up in Opelika, Alabama, and spent many summers with her grandparents, cultivating their backyard garden and her love of the outdoors. A graduate of Auburn University with a degree in biosystems engineering and a minor in agronomy and soils, she embarked on her hike of the Appalachian Trail in March 2015 and went on to hike the Pacific Crest Trail and the Continental Divide Trail. Sponsored by the Office of Campus Life and Student Development, the Outdoors Club, the Office of International Programs and the Office of the Provost.

Friday, March 15
Tournées Film Festival
7 p.m., McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building
The Tournées Film Festival will show rancophone films over several weeks in partnership with the FACE Foundation. All are on Friday evenings, beginning at 7 p.m. Tonight’s film is “Little by Little,” 1971 (Nigerian, French production), and the final film, “Fatma,” 2016 (French, Arabic production), will be shown March 22.

Tuesday, March 19
Women’ History Month Event
Women and Race Talk
11:15 a.m., location TBA
Jennifer Gutierrez-Caldwell, former director of diversity and inclusion at Wofford, will discuss the intersections of gender and race in society, focusing on the expectations of women of color to perform in and out of the workplace and how to combat societal expectations while coping with internal conflict. Sponsored by the Black Student Alliance and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Tuesday, March 19
Women’s History Month Event
LeadHer Tuesday: Protesting 101
5:15 p.m., The Space in the Mungo Center
On Tuesday’s during Women’s History Month, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion will host professional development workshops. This discussion will center on the ins and outs of protesting. Monier Abusaft, Wofford Class of 2011, of Spartanburg Juneteenth, will lead a workshop on how to support a cause that is important to you as well as discuss the legal rights all protestors should know. Refreshments will be provided. Sponsored by The Space in the Mungo Center, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Leadership Wofford and LGBTerriers.

Tuesday, March 19
Women’s History Month Event
Women and Mental Health
7 p.m., location TBA (check Daily Announcements)
Join Active Minds for a presentation and conversation about mental illness and women as well as women making a difference in the study of mental illness and mental health. Sponsored by Active Minds.

Tuesday, March 19
Dunlap Chamber Music Concert
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Performing in the Dunlap Chamber Music Concert will be David Kim, violin; Wendy Warner, cello; and Sandra Rivers, piano.

Tuesday, March 19
Wofford Writers Series
Speaker: G.C. Waldrep
7:30 p.m., Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building
G.C. Waldrep is the author most recently of “feast gently” (Tupelo, 2018) and the long poem “Testament” (BOA Editions, 2015). Other recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in APR, Poetry, Paris Review, New England Review, Yale Review, Colorado Review, Iowa Review, Conjunctions, New American Writing, Denver Quarterly and other journals. Waldrep lives in Lewisburg, Pa., where he teaches at Bucknell University and edits the journal West Branch. From 2007 to 2018 he served as editor-at-large for The Kenyon Review.

Wednesday, March 20
Women’s History Month Event
Trivia Night: Women’s History Edition
6 p.m., Game Room, Campus Life Building
This trivia game will have four rounds of 10 questions each. Points will be combined with each round, and the winning team will receive three $25 Visa gift cards. Sponsored by the Wofford Activities Council and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Thursday, March 21
Women’s History Month Event
International Day for Elimination of Racial Discrimination
11:15 a.m., Seal of Main Building
March 21 is International Day for Elimination of Racial Discrimination. The day commemorates and honors the lives lost in a 1960 South African protest against apartheid-passed laws. Come stand with Amnesty International in solidarity for peace and #endracialdiscrimination. Sponsored by Amnesty International Wofford College Chapter

Thursday, March 21
Opening Reception: “Art of the Carolinas”
4 p.m., Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
The opening reception will be held for “Art of the Carolinas,” an exhibition of the Jim and Kay Gross Collection, in the Sandor Teszler Library Gallery. The exhibition runs through Saturday, April 27. (See details under Gallery and Museum Exhibitions below.)

Thursday, March 21
Gallery Talk and Reception: “Scraps from My Mother’s Floor”
7 p.m., lobby, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
“Scraps from My Mother’s Floor,” an innovative solo exhibition by award-winning artist Dawn Williams Boyd, is on display in the café gallery of the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Boyd is a visual artist who began by painting with oils and acrylics on various surfaces before manipulating fabric to create her pieces, “painting” with fabric rather than on it. The event is part of Spartanburg’s monthly ArtWalk series. The exhibition runs through Saturday, March 30. (See details under Gallery and Museum Exhibitions below.)

Friday, March 22
Tournées Film Festival
7 p.m., McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building
The final film in the festival is “Fatma,” 2016 (French, Arabic production).

Saturday, March 23
Women’s History Month Event
“I Am Woman, Hear Me Roar”
11 a.m., Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village
Delta Delta Delta and the Panhellenic community will celebrate Wofford’s women with dance, yoga and snacks. Sponsored by Delta Delta Delta Sorority.

Tuesday, March 26
Women’s History Month Event
Women Abroad
5 p.m., location TBA (check Daily Announcements)
A panel discussion with students, alumni, faculty and staff will focus on the unique challenges and opportunities of being a student/scholar and a woman studying and researching abroad. A reception will follow. Sponsored by the dean of diversity and inclusion, the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, the Office of International Programs, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Presidential Committee on Diversity and Inclusion.

Tuesday, March 26
Conference on Gender
4 p.m., Montgomery Room, Burwell Building
Students from Wofford and other local colleges will present essays, poems and/or art work about gender-related issues. Dinner and beverages will be provided.

Tuesday, March 26
Autism Awareness: Light it Up Blue
7:30 p.m., Seal of Main Building
Wofford will hold its fourth annual Autism Awareness Program to help “Shine a Light on Autism.” The college will light up Main Building in blue throughout April in recognition of Autism Awareness Month. Tennis Coach Rod Ray, students and a guest speaker will share personal stories and knowledge to help educate and spread awareness and acceptance for individuals living with autism.

Tuesday, March 26
Guest Lecture: “Baroque Art”
Speaker: Dr. Wayne Franits, expert in 17th century Dutch and Flemish art
7:30 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Dr. Wayne Franits’ lecture will accompany an exhibit of Baroque art, “Sacred and Secular: Netherlandish Baroque Paintings from Regional Collections,” on the lower level of the Richardson Family Art Museum in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Franits has published extensively on a variety of topics in the field, ranging from genre painting and portraiture to the work of the Dutch followers of Caravaggio. He has published books on the early 17th century Dutch painter Dirck van Baburen (2013), Johannes Vermeer (2015) and Godefridus Schalcken (2018) as well as “The Ashgate Research Companion to Dutch Art of the Seventeenth Century” (2016). He is pursuing research on late 17th century art collections in English country houses and the portrayal of scholars in Dutch genre painting, the latter for an essay for the catalog of an exhibition to be held in Cologne and Prague in 2020. The exhibition runs through Sunday, May 19. (See more under Gallery and Museum Exhibitions below.)

Wednesday, March 27
Women’s History Month
Homeless Period Project Packing Party
4 p.m., Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village
Participants will learn more about the Homeless Period Project and pack all of the women’s hygiene products that were donated throughout the month. The event will include music and food. Sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority, the Office of Residence Life, Delta Delta Delta Sorority and Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority.

Gallery and Museum Exhibitions:

Through Saturday, March 30
Stoppages by Michael Webster
Richardson Family Art Gallery, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
Sculptures in this exhibition are a collection of fragments, contradictions and run-on thoughts about the physical world. They emerge from a fascination with systems of the built environment and objects that occupy our space. When Michael Webster, assistant professor of art and art history, collects found things, he often lives with them for years before incorporating them into a sculpture, adding something to their long-established history. A faded, peeled-up yellow road line is the material embodiment of the syntax that organizes movement, but can we also imagine what could exist beneath the road line, and allow an absurd moment to unravel the margins of the system?

Through Saturday, March 30
Dawn Williams Boyd: Scraps from My Mother’s Floor
Upper level, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
This exhibition features the work of figurative quilt painter Dawn Williams Boyd, whose artwork reflects her interests in American history as it affects and is affected by its African-American citizens. After 30 years painting in oils and acrylics on various surfaces, in 2002 Boyd began to “paint” with fabric instead of on it. Her large scale “cloth paintings” are representative, packed with vibrant, often life-sized figures and are strategically embellished with beads, sequins, cowry shells and hand embroidery. Large pieces often take more than 500 hours to complete. Through cutting, patching, surface embellishment and quilting, bits and pieces of fabric are transformed into modern visual storytelling.

Through Sunday, May 19
Sacred and Secular: Netherlandish Baroque Paintings from Regional Collections
Lower level, Richardson Family Art Museum, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
Dynamic and theatrical, but also down-to-earth, moralizing and sometimes comic. Triumphant, grandiose and propagandistic, and yet also intimate and inward. All of these terms are applicable to the art of the European Baroque, the cultural epoch of the 17th and 18th centuries, which produced an unprecedented richness and variety in creative expression. Complex and conflicting forces across the political, religious, economic and social spheres of life account for this artistic abundance. The Netherlands, a major center of artistic production during the Baroque period, was home to many of these contrasts and conflicts within its relatively small geographic boundaries along the northern coast of Europe. These diverse cultural forces are evident, in varying ways and degrees, in a selection of paintings generously loaned to Wofford College by the Bob Jones University Museum and Gallery in Greenville, S.C.; the Columbia Museum of Art in Columbia, S.C.; and the Robicsek Family Collection in Charlotte, N.C.

Through Sunday, May 19
Graphic Solidarity: The Internationalist Outlook of the Cuban Revolution
Upper level, Richardson Family Art Museum, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
This exhibition features posters produced in Cuba during the period following the revolution through the 1980s. The highlighted posters focus on Cuba’s efforts to spread the messages of its revolution worldwide and to inspire others in the fight against oppression stemming from the legacy of imperialism and colonialism. Primarily published by the OSPAAAL organization based in Havana, these works helped to facilitate the internationalist outlook and message of the Cuban revolution through their inclusion in the Tricontinental magazine, which reached people in more than 60 countries worldwide. The works in the exhibition are on loan from the collection of Lindsay Webster of Spartanburg, S.C. Curated by Katie McCorkle, class of 2019, this exhibition is a culmination of her yearlong honors project for art history and government.

Hours for the Richardson Family Art Gallery and the Richardson Family Art Museum:
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 1-5 p.m.; Thursday, 1-9 p.m.; Sunday and Monday, closed. Special hours will be observed during the week of Wofford’s Commencement: Saturday, May 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, May 19, noon-4 p.m.

Through Saturday, April 27
Jim and Kay Gross Collection: Art of the Carolinas
Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
“Art of the Carolinas,” an exhibition of the Jim and Kay Gross Collection, features works by artists across South Carolina and North Carolina, collected by Jim and Kay Gross, avid supporters of the arts in Spartanburg since the 1960s. A professor of English at Wofford for over four decades, Gross founded the Wofford Theatre Workshop, served many terms on the Spartanburg Board of the Arts Council and twice was president of the Spartanburg Gallery Committee as well as the Spartanburg Ballet Guild. The exhibition runs through Saturday, April 27. The opening reception will be held at 4 p.m. Thursday, March 21.