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Wofford scholar named to USA Today Academic Team

Friday, February 13, 2004

SPARTANBURG, SC – Wofford College student Allyn Steele, currently traveling overseas as the college’s Presidential International Scholar, has been selected as one of 60 members of USA Today’s 2004 All-USA College Academic Teams. His second team selection recognizes Steele as one of the top 40 students in the nation.

Wofford College is the only South Carolina institution with a student on any of the USA Today academic teams, published in the newspaper’s Feb. 12 edition.

Former Wofford Presidential International Scholars Kris Neely of Spartanburg, S.C., and Allyson Gibson of The Woodlands, Tex., previously were selected for team’s honorable mentions list.

As the Presidential International Scholar, Steele, son of Dr. and Mrs. John Steele of Cleveland, N.C., has been traveling around to the world to various developing countries studying water resource management and the various conflicts that can arise from the need for the resource.

A Charles E. Daniel Scholar, Steele is a dean’s list student and is a member of the Blue Key National Honor Fraternity. Past activities have included Twin Towers student volunteer organization and serving as assistant editor of The Journal literary publication.

He studied in Thailand at the Council for International Educational Exchange and the Research and Development Institute of Khon Kaen University during the fall of 2002. He also studied abroad, in London and Ireland, during Interim 2002. During the summer of 2002, he worked at the Center for Talented Youth Summer Program of Johns Hopkins University, Siena College site, in New York.

Steele also is a member of the Wofford Singers, the Wofford Men (an a cappella group), is a Wofford Ambassador, a Wofford Scholar, and a member of the Women’s History Month Committee. He plays intramural soccer and is lead singer, violinist and writer in a contemporary folk-rock band called The Chinese Cowboys.

The Presidential International Scholar is chosen personally each year by Wofford’s president as “the singular student best fitted to benefit humankind.” An anonymous donor funds the scholarship. The scholar spends his or her senior year visiting developing countries around the world and conducting research on an independent study project, returning for a fifth year to complete regular coursework and sharing what was learned during the travels.