Home > Newsroom

Faculty and Staff Bookshelf catalogs books written or edited by Wofford faculty and staff, listed alphabetically by last name. Books coming soon are listed at the bottom of this page.

  • Military Chaplin

    The Military Chaplain

    by Clarence L. Abercrombie III
    Professor of Biological and Social Sciences
    SAGE Publications
    (1977)

    "In his book Abercrombie shows the marks of a social scientist, impelled by a twin loyalty to his religious faith and to the armed forces of the United States, who investigates a special manifestation of problems arising at the juncture of religious and secular loyalties.  He focuses on the United States Army chaplaincy, in the period during and immediately following the Vietnam War."  -from the foreword by Bruce M. Russett

  • Powers Seay House

    Embarcing the Seay House: A Sampler of its Life and Times

    by Linda Bilanchone
    Communications Professor
    Spartanburg County Historical Association
    (2010)

    The Seay House on Crescent Avenue in Spartanburg is one of those places where a visitor can effortlessly step back in time. A stypical 19th century farmstead first owned by a leading citizen of the village, it was the domain of two unmarried sisters after the Civil War. The house remained intact on its original site overlooking Fairforest Creek until it could be acquired and restored in the 1970s and 1980s by the Spartanburg County Historical Association. Linda Powers Bilanchone teaches communications at Wofford and volunteers for the historical association. She compiled most of this book by researching newspaper files and other contemporary sources. Dr. Phillip Stone added an interesting commentary of the house and the city during the Civil War. Goodall Environmental Center Director John Lane, who grew up near the house, contributed a personal afterword.

  • The Truman Years

    The Truman Years, 1945-1953

    by Mark S. Byrnes
    Associate Professor of History
    Addison-Wesley/ Pearson Education Ltd.
    (2000)

    Written in a lively style, The Truman Years, offers a concise, accessible and illuminating history on an important and fascinating period in American history.  It is recommended for college students as well as for anyone trying to understand the legacy of Truman's presidency.  -Wofford Today

  • Familiar Ground

    Familiar Ground

    by Elizabeth Cox
    John Cobb Professor in the Humantities
    Athenuem
    (1984)

    "Cox's first novel reveals her as a writer of deep insights and a talent for conveying a sense of time and place...Holds the reader's interest and a promise of fine novels to come." -Publishers Weekly

  • The Ragged Way People Fall Out Of Love

    The Ragged Way People Fall Out of Love

    by Elizabeth Cox
    John Cobb Professor in the Humantities
    North Point
    (1991)

    "The elegieac and meticulously observed family portrait leaves the reader appreciative but also wary; only in art can the mistakes of our lives be measured with such grace and forgiveness, or redeemed through such close attention." -The New Yorker

  • Night Talk

    Night Talk

    by Elizabeth Cox
    John Cobb Professor in the Humantities
    Graywolf
    (1997)

    "Affecting, resonant...Reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird."-Library Journal

  • Bargains In The Real World

    Bargains in the Real World

    by Elizabeth Cox
    John Cobb Professor in the Humantities
    Random House
    (2001)

    In this finely crafted collection, acclaimed writer Elizabeth Cox examines the lives of common people and how they deal with life when uncommon things happen to them — how they accept their fate, sometimes choosing to move on, sometimes not. The stories, many set in the South, deal with questions of loyalty, betrayal, discovery, sexuality, death, birth, and the inner dynamics that drive the choices we make. The characters struggle with a complex mixture of kindness and violence, and their final choices reveal a flawed but finally compassionate humanity. Contains the 1994 O. Henry Award winning story, "The Third of July."

  • The Slow Moon

    The Slow Moon

    by Elizabeth Cox
    John Cobb Professor in the Humantities
    Random House
    (2006)

    Cox's carefully wrought latest (following Familiar Ground) delineates the heartbreaking cruelty that sunders a group of adolescent friends in a small Tennessee town. During a late-night party, high school sweethearts Sophie and Crow go off into the woods. When Crow leaves Sophie for 20 minutes to fetch a condom, she's raped and beaten by a group of boys she will not be able to identify after the trauma. To the shock of the town, Crow, known to be a fine and upstanding young man, is charged with her attack. Cox painstakingly enters the consciousness of the various characters who have a stake in Crow's fate, including his diffident, religious mother, Helen, and adulterous stepfather, Carl; Crow's younger brother, Johnny, who struggles to come to terms with his homosexual attraction for Tom, one of the boys in Crow's band; the judge adjudicating Crow's case, Aurelia Bailey, who has to manage her own troubled teenage boy, Bobbie; and other teens and townsfolk. The fact of Crow's innocence is plain to all, yet no one moves to defend him, not even Sophie, who claims she can't remember what happened. Cox stands back and lets the truth emerge with quiet determination.  -Publishers Weekly

  • Curtis Expecting Goodness

    Expecting Goodness & Other Stories

    by C. Michael Curtis
    John C. Cobb Professor in the Humanities
    John F. Blair
    (2009)

    When renowned fiction editor C. Michael Curtis moved from Boston to a small Southern college town to accept a distinguished chair in the English Department, he assumed he'd be far from a literary center. But Curtis, long-time fiction editor of The Atlantic and self-professed "habitual anthologist," found himself in a pocket of extraordinary writers in Spartanburg, South Carolina, home of the Hub City Writers Project. The venerable literary editor's exploration of his new city has led to the publication of Expecting Goodness, a collection of 20 Southern short stories by both established and up-and-coming authors who share the same hometown. The title story by Michel S. Stone transpires in an airport as a hesitant young husband begins his journey toward an adopted child. In Rosa Shand's heartbreaking "Sweetness," a 15-year-old Charleston girl discovers her mother's lesbian love affair ("I knew we were in hell," she says). Two teenage boys looking for a good time encounter a deadbeat, aging Jack Kerouac in Deno Trakas's "Pretty Pitiful God." There's levity in this collection, too; in Lou Dischler's offbeat "Lola's Prayer," a file clerk believes she has lost a pregnant chinchilla up the tailpipe of her Toyota. Among contributors are Thomas McConnell, author of the story collection A Picture Book of Hell (Texas Tech University Press); National Public Radio producer Thomas Pierce; Susan Tekulve, whose collection My Mother's War Stories received the Winnow Press Fiction Prize; and Elizabeth Cox, author of A Slow Moon (Random House, 2001). Expect goodness from all of them.

  • Cottonwood Trail

    Cottonwood Trail: Glimpses of Wildness in the Heart of Spartanburg

    by G.R. Davis and Peter Schmunk
    Professor of Biology/ Professor and Chair of the Department of Fine Arts
    Hub City Writers Project
    (2006)

    This place matters ... So says talented essayist Thomas Webster, who spent his youth in the place that has come to be known as the Cottonwood Trail and now regularly takes his own family to this special place on Spartanburg's eastside. This place matters, he says, because it is full of things you rarely see in the more urban parts of the city:In these eighty-five acres, on these three and a half miles of trail, exists more mystery than even the most generous lifetime will afford me to wonder over. And we should never imagine that it's forever, never squander a chance to see what is here now.For those who have never had the privilege to visit the Edwin M. Griffin Preserve -- or simply want a preview before taking a first trip -- two wonderful Spartanburg photographers present an enticing array of more than 100 colorful images capturing four seasons of life along the Cottonwood Trail. G.R. Davis Jr. and Peter L. Schmunk have pointed the lenses of their cameras at the delicate blossoms of the Carolina Silverbell, the guarded eyes of the great blue heron, the winding vines of the muscadine, and the swirling water of Lawson's Fork. Thanks to their artistry, you'll see in the pages of this book the languid northern water snake, the rare blooming columbine, a turtle burrowing in the wetland, and much more.And if you're a regular visitor to the Cottonwood Trail, these essays and images beckon you to return to the woods, to listen more attentively, to look around you with a new awareness. Together, the words and photographs here illustrate that the South Carolina Piedmont can be every bit as beautiful and diverse as the coastal region. The message here: These acres -- and many more like them in the Upstate -- deserve conservation and protection

  • Breaking Cycles Of Violence

    Breaking Cycles of Violence: Conflict Prevention in Interstate Crisis

    by Janie Leatherman, William DeMars, Patrick D. Gaffney, and Raimo Vayrynen
    Professor and Department Chair of Government
    Kumarian Press
    (1999)

    This timely book studies how to target and prioritize resources in societies at immediate risk for violent conflict. The text develops guidelines, illustrated in the cases of Burundi and Macedonia, for assessing the causes of conflict through early warning indicators, while presenting multidimensional strategies to transform them. Preventative action is seen as a means to contain conflicts and rehabilitate societies throughout the escalation, violence, and post-conflict cycle.-Kumarian Press

  • NGOs And Transnational Networks

    NGOs and Transnational Networks: Wild Cards in World Politics

    by William E. DeMars
    Professor and Department Chair of Government
    Pluto Press
    (2005)

    Non-Governmental Organizations and their networks are proliferating in all regions of the world. They address every transnational issue from population to peace, human rights to species rights, genocide to AIDS. Supporters claim NGOs are effective in achieving their goals, while detractors counter that NGO power is paltry compared to governments and corporations. Challenging both views, DeMars irreverently reveals the political claims implicit in every transnational NGO. They are best conceptualized, he argues, not in terms of either principles or power, but through the partners they make in transnational society and politics. NGOs and transnational networks institutionalize conflict as much as cooperation, and reshape states and societies, often inadvertently. NGOs have overthrown dictators, provided life support for collapsed states, and reengineered the family. Their historical origins contrast sharply with current realities, and show signs of radical change in the future.

  • Dinkins Our Dissertations

    Our Dissertations, Ourselves

    by Christine Sorrell Dinkins
    Associate Professor, Chair, Philosophy
    MacMillan
    (2014)

    Our Dissertations, Ourselves engages readers in intimate stories from twenty women who wrote doctoral dissertations across nine disciplines: biology, English literature, modern languages, history, mathematics, music, nursing, philosophy, and social work. Their stories bring to light the common experiences, emotions, and challenges in the sometimes overwhelming process of writing a dissertation amidst a full and complex life. Through dialogue with these women, the authors found that much of the dissertation journey is shaped by the challenges and transformations in the writer's own identity and relationships. Designed to invite readers into shared experiences, this book provides support and guidance for women writing dissertations, their advisors, and all those on the journey with them, inviting readers to gain new understandings of the often-isolating world of the dissertation writer and celebrate the courage and creativity that these twenty women demonstrate.

  • Listening To The Whispers

    Listening to the Whispers: Rethinking Ethics in Healthcare

    by edited by Christine Sorrell Dinkins and Jeanne Merkle Sorrell
    Associate Professor of Philosophy
    Universtiy of Wisconsin Press
    (2006)

    Listening to the Whispers gives voice to scholars in philosophy, medical anthropology, physical therapy, and nursing, helping readers re-think ethics across the disciplines in the context of today's healthcare system. Diverse voices, often unheard, challenge readers to enlarge the circle of their ethical concerns and look for hidden pathways toward new understandings of ethics. Essays range from a focus on the context of corporatization and managed care environments to a call for questioning the fundamental values of society as these values silently affect many others in healthcare. Each chapter is followed by a brief essay that highlights issues useful for scholarly research and classroom discussion. The conversations of interpretive research in healthcare contained in this volume encourage readers to re-think ethics in ways that will help to create an ethical healthcare system with a future of new possibilities.

  • Fisher Hampton Heights

    Hampton Heights of Spartanburg: Its History, Houses, and People

    by Vivian B. Fisher
    Retired chair of the English Department
    Spartanburg County Historical Association
    (2011)

    From its beginnings in 1892 through the mid-20th century, the neighborhood of Hampton Heights in the center of Spartanburg produced some of the city's outstanding leaders in the professions, the arts, and business. In the 1960s and 1970s middle-class flight to new suburbs took its toll on Spartanburg's city center, including Hampton Heights, but the lovely houses attracted new generations of residents, and the neighborhood is again flourishing, its resurgence fueling the renaissance of the downtown business district. Dr. Vivian Fisher, retired chair of the Wofford English department, spent years researching, taking photographs and writing this beautiful, full-color book that chronicles and celebrates Spartanburg's first downtown neighborhood. Fisher and her husband, Jim Newcome, continue to live in Hampton Heights. They are restoring their West Hampton Queen Anne home after a fire that damaged much of the interior and upper floors. Filled with important historic photographs, many in print for the first time, as well as recent color pictures, this book, available in May, makes a significant contribution to studies of Spartanburg. Proceeds from the sale of the book benefit the Spartanburg County Historical Association.  

  • Auggie The Akward Elf

    The Legend of Auggie the Awkward Elf

    by Dianne Fuller
    Coordinator of Special Projects and Assistant to the Senior Vice President (Ret.)
    Candle Fly Press
    (2001)

    A family Christmas story about the mishaps and misadventures of a young elf at the North Pole.  It's original and fast moving.  Auggie doesn't have magical powers or a fairy godmother to make his troubles disappear.  He has to deal with life's difficulties and his own shortcomings much like everyone else, although he has his own unique way of doing so.  A delightful story of courage and perseverance in search for-and acceptance of-one's self.

  • Howe, What Hath God Wrought

    What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1845-1848

    by Daniel Walker Howe
    Lewis P. Jones Visiting Professor of History
    Oxford University Press
    (2007)

    Howe was the Lewis P. Jones Visiting Professor of History at Wofford in the spring of 2011.  This important contribution to the multi-volume Oxford History of the United States won the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2008. It is a remarkable work of narrative and synthesis that "lay readers" will truly enjoy. The title of the book (note that it does not include a question mark!) is remembered as the first message sent by telegraph, a revolutionary means of communication that was perfected by Samuel F. B. Morse in 1844. That event brought a symbolic end to three critical decades of American history. Those years saw the rapid growth of multiple market economies, the awakened vigor of networks of Protestant churches and other voluntary organizations, and the emergence of mas political parties. Thus, "the Age of Jackson" is not a completely satisfactory term to describe the progress of American modernization that led to division and reunion in the 1860s. Howe is Rhodes Professor of American History, Emeritus at Oxford University and Professor of History, and Emeritus at UCLA.He is the author of the "Political Culture of the American Whigs" and "Making the American Self: Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln."

  • Problems Of Evil And The Power Of God

    Problems of Evil and the Power of God

    by James A. Keller
    Samuel Pate Gardner Professor and Department Chair of Philosophy
    Ashgate Publishing (Philosophy of Religion Series)
    (2007)

  • Fairy Tale Beginnings

    Ingeborg Bachmann's Telling Stories: Fairy Tale Beginnings & Holocaust Endings

    by Kirsten A. Krick-Aigner
    Associate Professor of Foreign Languages
    Ariadne Press
    (2002)

     Bachmann (1926-1973) is a highly recognized Austrian postwar author whose work has been translated into English.  Krick-Aigner's book explores the author's prose in a socio-cultural and historical context by demonstrating how she applies elements from traditional German and Austrian fairy tales to come to terms with evens of the Third Reich and her reactions to the Holocaust.-Wofford Today

  • As The World Sleeps Around Us

    As the World Around Us Sleeps

    by John Lane
    Associate Professor of English
    Briarpatch Press
    (1992)

    "John Lane is a poet who knows natural things, and who watches, records and celebrates...he is a poet to watch"-Ruth Moose, The News & Observer - Raleigh, NC

  • Against Information

    Against Information and Other Poems

    by John Lane
    Associate Professor of English
    New Native Press
    (1995)

    "For any who might have doubted that the human brain is the most explosively articulate of expert systems or feared that the best minds of our re-generation are being devoured by the Internet, this is the howl of the '90s, a poetic rallying cry for humane technology."-Benjamin Dunlap, Wofford College

  • Hub City Anthology

    Hub City Anthology

    by edited by John Lane and Betsy Teter
    Associate Professor of English
    Hub City Writer's Project
    (1996)

    Hub City Anthology is a collection of personal essays, artwork and photographs by the original group of Hub City representatives. Though Hub City Anthology is a book about Spartanburg, it is also a book with a much larger context. It's a book about a boomtown Southern community seeking to find its voice in the face of enormous change.The essays in the book are, among other subjects, about places lost. Life in the suburbs, weird religion, threatened green spaces, the county fair, family reunions and, yes, of course, trains. The authors in this collection are young and old, black and white, native and newcomer.

  • Hub City Christmas

    Hub City Christmas

    by edited by John Lane and Betsy Teter
    Associate Professor of English
    Hub City Writer's Project
    (1997)

    Thirty-two Spartanburg writers contributed seasonal stories to this book, which has been a favorite in the area for many years. These authors invite you to spend Christmas in Campobello, King's Creek, Cowpens, Camp Croft, Clifton and Converse Heights. They take you to the lights of Hampton Heights, Woodridge and a Dickensian downtown, allowing you to wander through tales of "Christmas Cotton," "Granddaddy's Song," and "The Christmas Stick," among many, many others.

  • The Woods Stretched For Miles

    The Woods Stretched for Miles: New Nature Writings From the South

    by edited by Gerald Thurmond and John Lane
    Professor of Sociology/ Assistant Professor of English
    University of Georgia Press
    (1999)

    The Woods Stretched for Miles gathers essays about southern landscape and nature from nineteen writers with geographic or ancestral ties to the region. This remarkable group encompasses not only such well-known names as Wendell Berry and Rick Bass but also distinctive new voices, including Christopher Camuto, Susan Cerulean, and Eddy L. Harris. From the savannas of south Florida through the hardwood uplands of Mississippi to the coastal rivers of the Carolinas and the high mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee, the range in geography covered is equally broad. With insight and eloquence, these diverse talents take up similar themes: environmental restoration, the interplay between individual and community, the definition of wildness in an area transformed by human activity, and the meaning of our reactions to the natural world. Readers will treasure the passionate and intelligent honorings of land and nature offered by this rich anthology. With the publication of The Woods Stretched for Miles, southern voices establish their abiding place in the ever-popular nature writing genre.  -University of Georgia Press

  • Dead Father Poems

    The Dead Father Poems

    by John Lane and Douglas Whittle
    Associate Professor and Director of the Glendale Shoals Environmental Studies Center
    Horse & Buggy Press
    (2000)

    Both of these artists lost their fathers to suicide, and by working together they were able to explore the artistic edges of grief, memory, and healing. The poems, written over a ten year period, have appeared in such literary journals as The Virginia Quarterly Review, Poetry Northwest, Tar River Poetry, and The Cattahoochee Review.-Horse & Buggy Press

  • Once Again Wilderness

    The Once-Again Wilderness: Following Wendell Berry into the Red River Gorge

    by edited by Jeremy L.C. Jones and John Lane; photo editing by Mark Olencki
    Lecturer in English/ Associate Professor of English
    Holocene Publishing
    (2001)

    This book is an anthology of essays and photos by faculty and students from the Sayre School of Lexington, Kentucky.  The essays were written on an outdoors trip to experience Wendell Berry's work and follow the path he sets forth in his essay, The Unforseen Wilderness. The journey along the Red River allowed the students to connect with Berry's work, led by poet and essayist John Lane and photographer Mark Olencki, both of whom were visiting Sayre as part of the Books Alive author series.

  • Vince Miller

    A Packet for Vincent Miller

    by edited by Donald Greiner and John Lane
    Associate Professor of English
    Holocene Publishing
    (2002)

    This collection honors Dr. Vincent E. Miller, Professor of English Emeritus. Wofford alumni who learned to "read" through questions of Professor Miller are honorring his years as a teacher, mentor and scholar by publishing A Packet for Vincent Miller.  Dr. Don Greiner '62, associate provost and dean of undergraduate affairs at the University of South Carolina, wrote the preface to the Miller book and selected a collection of Miller's own essays and reviews on modern writers to include.  He and co-editor John Lane '77, associate professor of English, then commissioned five former Miller students to write tributes.  The book also holds several of Miller's "teaching" documents.-Wofford Today

  • Waist Deep In Black Water

    Waist Deep in Black Water

    by John Lane
    Associate Professor of English
    University of Georgia Press
    (2002; reprinted in paperback 2004)

    Exquisite descriptions that recall the beauty and mystery of the earth as it must have been in raw and unfettered times.  -Southern LivingWaist Deep in Black Water offers a collection of Lane's own writings that range from wilderness exploration, to conservation issues, to explorations of family history in Spartanburg, SC.  Something is always at stake wherever Lane takes us: a stand of old-growth trees, a primate population, a friendship, a soul.  Lane bestows loving attention on the places and people he visits in this collection and, in the process, goes beyond traditional travel writing.  -Wofford Today

  • Noble Trees

    Noble Trees of the South Carolina Upcountry

    by Poetry by John Lane; Photography by Mark Olencki and Mark Dennis; Introduction by Michael A. Dirr
    Associate Professor of English
    Hub City Writers Project
    (2003)

    Inside these pages, renowned plant professor Michael A. Dirr articulates his Noble Tree vision: preserving the Upcountry's green giants and re-planting the region with "trees for the ages" -- those that transcend generations, become fodder for legends and reach out for the heavens. Alongside him, Spartanburg poet John Lane uses forests and yards as his inspiration, turning their tulip poplars, their cottonwoods, even their "Sequoia" redwoods into memorable characters in his verse. Together, Dirr and Lane speak the language of these noble survivors, reminding us they are our neighbors, our kin, and our charge.-Hub City Writers Project

  • Chattooga

    Chattooga: Descending into the Myth of Deliverance River

    by John Lane
    Associate Professor of English
    University of Georgia Press
    (2004)

    "Having previously explored the river, Lane returns to journey the entire length of it, describing its natural beauty and danger as well as pausing to view it through the prism of Dickey's book. . . . Lane artfully applies his poetic sensibility to the river itself . . . Lane's own writing and observations are good enough to stand outside of Dickey's considerable shadow."  -Publishers Weekly

  • Circling Home

    Circling Home

    by John Lane
    Associate Professor of English
    UGA Press
    (2007)

    After many years of limited commitments to people or places, writer and naturalist John Lane married in his late forties and settled down in his hometown of Spartanburg, in the South Carolina piedmont. He, his wife, and two stepsons built a sustainable home in the woods near Lawson's Fork Creek. Soon after settling in, Lane pinpointed his location on a topographical map. Centering an old, chipped saucer over his home, he traced a circle one mile in radius and set out to explore the area. What follows from that simple act is a chronicle of Lane's deepening knowledge of the place where he'll likely finish out his life. An accomplished hiker and paddler, Lane discovers, within a mile of his home, a variety of coexistent landscapes--ancient and modern, natural and manmade. There is, of course, the creek with its granite shoals, floodplain, and surrounding woods. The circle also encompasses an eight-thousand-year-old cache of Native American artifacts, graves of a dozen British soldiers killed in 1780, an eighteenth-century ironworks site, remnants of two cotton plantations, a hundred-year-old country club, a sewer plant, and a smattering of mid- to late twentieth-century subdivisions.Lane's explorations intensify his bonds to family, friends, and colleagues as they sharpen his sense of place. By looking more deeply at what lies close to home, both the ordinary and the remarkable, Lane shows us how whole new worlds can open up.

  • Perfect Competition And The Transformation Of Economics

    Perfect Competition and the Transformation of Economics

    by Frank M. Machovec
    Professor of Economics
    Routledge
    (1995)

    The assumptions of perfect information and perfect competition have been at the heart of neo-classical economics. However, in Perfect Competition and the Transformation of Economics, Frank Machovec demonstrates that the Walrasian vision has had a detrimental impact on the definition of economics and on its policy prescriptions. The author examines how economists came to accept an interventionist approach to domestic policy issues, and how the perfect-competition model transformed four key areas of study: industrial organization; comparative systems; the economics of development; international trade.  -Routledge

  • Death And Survival In The Book Of Job

    Death and Survival in the Book of Job: Desymbolization and Traumatic Experience

    by Dan Mathewson
    Assistant Professor of Religion
    T&T Clark
    (2006)

     The Book of Job functions as literature of survival where the main character, Job, deals with the trauma of suffering, attempts to come to terms with a collapsed moral and theological world, and eventually re-connects the broken pieces of his world into a new moral universe, which explains and contains the trauma of his recent experiences and renders his life meaningful again. The key is Job's death imagery. In fact, with its depiction of death in the prose tale and its frequent discussions of death in the poetic sections, Job may be the most death-oriented book in the bible. In particular, Job, in his speeches, articulates his experience of suffering as the experience of death. To help understand this focus on death in Job we turn to the psychohistorian, Robert Lifton, who investigates the effects on the human psyche of various traumatic experiences (wars, natural disasters, etc). According to Lifton, survivors of disaster often sense that their world has "collapsed" and they engage in a struggle to go on living. Part of this struggle involves finding meaning in death and locating death's place in the continuity of life. Like many such survivors, Job's understanding of death is a flashpoint indicating his bewilderment (or "desymbolization") in the early portions of his speeches, and then, later on, his arrival at what Lifton calls "resymbolization," the reconfiguration of a world that can account for disaster and render death - and life - meaningful again.

  • Economics Study Guide

    Study Guide for The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets - 6th edition

    by John R. McArthur and Frederic S. Mishkin
    Associate Professor and Department Chair of Economics
    Pearson Addison Wesley
    (2000)

    This study guide accompanies The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, the number one text in the field.  McArthur and Mishkin produce this study guide, an instructor's manual and test bank of questions and problems, since their collaboration began in 1986.

  • The Place Of The Gospel In The General History Of Literature

    The Place of the Gospels in the General History of Literature by Karl Ludwig Schmidt

    by translated by Byron R. McCane
    Albert C. Outler Professor of Religion and Department Chair
    University of South Carolina Press
    (2002)

    Karl Ludwig Schmidt's classic Die Stellung der Evangelien der allgemeinen Literaturgeschichte was one of a handful of twentieth-century essays on the New Testament to set the agenda for an entire generation of New Testament scholars. First published in 1923, the text laid out Schmidt's contention that the gospels represent a literary genre that does not derive from others in the ancient world. In portraying the gospels as the written record of an oral tradition rather than as biographical or historical text, the German scholar found points of comparison with the Sayings of the Desert Fathers and the later collections of Faust legends. Schmidt's powerful argument has commanded attention in Germany for decades but has never before been fully available in English. In recent years the question of gospel genre has reemerged as an issue of debate. With this translation, Byron R. McCane enables a new generation of English-speaking scholars to engage with Schmidt's classic perspective on an enduring question.  -University of South Carolina Press

  • Roll Back The Stone

    Roll Back the Stone: Death and Burial in the World of Jesus

    by Byron R. McCane
    Albert C. Outler Professor of Religion and Department Chair
    Trinity Press International
    (2003)

    The Good Friday sequence of events is well-known and recorded in Christian scripture and traditions.  These events would have made sense to Jesus' contemporaries, as it stands in close harmony with Jewish customs and traditions of the time as understood by modern archaeology and anthropology. In Roll Back the Stone, McCane investigates these death and burial customs because such events create rifts in a social network, often reflecting efforts within a community to compensate and reaffirm traditional beliefs.  Typically, if one sees death and burial customs in transition, these changes reflect a significant upheaval in other aspects of a culture, such as in Roman-occupied Judea during the time of Christ.  -Wofford Today 

  • Southern Seen

    Southern Seen: Meditations on Past and Present

    by Larry T. McGehee
    Professor Emeritus of Religion
    University of Tennessee Press
    (2005)

    Southern Seen collects Larry McGehee's numerous newspaper columns exploring the South's history, inhabitants, mannerisms, food, and foibles.  The book is divided into eight categories: outdoors, place, education, people, conflict, food, play, and religion.  His subjects range from the outdoors and the creatures that inhabit it to the Civil War and its battle sites to distinctive southern symbols and the South's particular culinary delicacies.Through the stories of famous figures, local residents, and the folk traditions that shape everyday life, McGehee celebrates the diversity of life in the South and offers irreplaceable insights into what continues to make the region unique.

  • Historical Dictionary of Existentialism

    Historical Dictionary of Existentialism

    by Stephen Michelman
    Associate Professor of Philosophy
    Scarecrow Press
    (2008)

  • Pittman Book 2009

    Fat Detection: Taste, Texture, and Post Ingestive Effects

    by Dr. Dave Pittman (Chapter 4)
    Associate Professor of Psychology
    Frontiers in Neuroscience CRC Press
    (2009)

    Why is fat so tasty, why do we crave it, and what is the impact of dietary fat on health and disease? These are the fundamental questions this book aims to answer through 22 chapters contributed by leading scientists in the field. The undeniable sensory appeal of fat may have deep roots; some might even argue that the ability to select energy-dense foods is crucial for survival. Over the last two decades, numerous studies investigating the gustatory mechanisms and sensory factors underlying the innate preference for dietary fat have accumulated. In Chapter 4, David Pittman highlights important findings on the detection of fatty acids and the modulation of fatty acids responsiveness by gender and strain of rats. Providing a comprehensive review of the literature from the leading scientists in the field, this volume delivers a holistic view of how the palatability and orosensory properties of dietary fat impact food intake and ultimately health. Fat Detection represents a new frontier in the study of food perception, food intake, and related health consequences.

  • Lives They Lived

    The Lives They Lived: A Look at Women in the History of Spartanburg

    by edited by Linda Powers
    Instructor in English
    Altman Press
    (1981)

    Published in 1981 as a part of the City of Spartanburg's celebration of the city's sesquicentennial, The Lives They Lived: A Look at Women in the History of Spartanburg was funded by the Spartanburg County Foundation and the South Carolina Committee for the Humanities.  The book highlights contributions of several women in the growth of the city and county of Spartanburg.  Revolutionary War heroines, educators, philanthropists, and slave women are among those included in collection of essays about Spartanburg women.

  • Spartanburg Pictorial History

    Spartanburg County: A Pictorial History

    by Philip N. Racine
    William R. Kenan Professor of History
    Donning Publishers
    (1980)

    Philip Racine's Spartanburg County: A Pictorial History took readers on a visual tour of Spartanburg, an upstate South Carolina city with a rich history. Treasured by teachers and local history aficionados, Pictorial History remained in demand long after it went out of print.-Hub City Writers Project 

  • Fiery Trail

    The Fiery Trail: A Union Officer’s Account of Sherman’s Last Campaigns

    by Richard Harwell and Philip N. Racine
    William R. Kenan Professor of History
    University of Tennessee Press
    (1986)

    "Thomas Ward Osborn's journal turns Sherman's march into a Fiery Trail indeed, especially when it reaches the Carolinas. Students and buffs of the Civil War and historians of the Confederacy will find it indispensable."  -C. Vann Woodward, Yale University

  • Piedmont Farmer

    Piedmont Farmer: The Journals of David Golightly Harris 1855-1870

    by edited by Philip N. Racine
    William R. Kenan Professor of History
    University of Tennessee Press
    (1990)

    "Let us begin by discussing the weather,” U. B. Phillips writes in the opening lines of his famous book on Life and Labor in the Old South, and that is exactly what David Golightly Harris, a small slaveholder from the South Carolina upcountry, does over and over again in this unique and beautifully edited diary.Although often tired, sick, or discouraged, David Harris faithfully wrote in his diary for fifteen years. He understood that one day it would serve “as a looking glass to look into & to see the past" (p. 454). We are fortunate he did, for Piedmont Farmer is one of those rare books that deserves a place alongside The Cotton Kingdom, My Bondage and My Freedom, The Children of Pride, Mary Chesnut's Civil War, and the recent Freedom volumes as an indispensable source for historians of the nineteenth-century South.-David C. Rankin, University of California Irvine

  • Unspoiled Heart

    “Unspoiled Heart”: The Journal of Charles Mattocks of the 17th Maine

    by edited by Philip N. Racine
    William R. Kenan Professor of History
    University of Tennessee Press
    (1994)

    "This diary of a combat officer in the Army of the Potomac provides an up-front view of the Civil War. It is exceptionally valuable because Major Charles Mattocks of the Seventeenth Maine also kept up his diary during ten months as a prisoner of war after his capture in the Battle of the Wilderness.... Every student of the Civil War will learn something new from this book."-James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom    

  • Seeing Spartanburg

    Seeing Spartanburg: A History in Images

    by Philip N. Racine
    William R. Kenan Professor of History
    Hub City Writers Project
    (1999)

    Racine traces Spartanburg's history from its beginnings during the Colonial period, through the boom years of the early twenti­eth century and the hard days of war and depression, to the dynamic growth of the present era. Like a good poem, Seeing Spartanburg does not merely tell the city's story; it shows the story. Filled with images that are often poignant, sometimes surprising, and always rewarding, Seeing Spartanburg is a visual record of the life of one Southern city. It echoes many familiar themes of Southern life, yet the story it tells is filled with the particular details that make Spartanburg unique.-Hub City Writer's Project

  • Wildflowers Of South Carolina

    A Guide to the Wildflowers of South Carolina

    by Richard Dwight Porcher and Douglas Alan Rayner; photographs by Richard Dwight Porcher
    Professor of Biology
    University of South Carolina Press
    (2001)

    Admired by plant enthusiasts, botanists, and nature lovers of all ages, wildflowers comprise one of the most beloved—and diverse—groupings of flora in South Carolina. Although relatively small in size, the Palmetto State hosts a remarkable variety of wildflower species, from the trillium and bloodroot that brighten its forests to heliotrope and common toadflax that dot the state's roadsides and fields. With color photographs (all by Richard D. Porcher) and extensive descriptions of more than 680 species, A Guide to the Wildflowers of South Carolina offers a complete and indispensable reference for finding and appreciating these natural treasures.Employing the same innovative approach Richard D. Porcher used in Wildflowers of the Carolina Lowcountry, he and Douglas A. Rayner simplify the task of identification by grouping species according to habitat. For each species identified, Porcher and Rayner include interesting facts—many of which are not widely known or readily available—about rarity, suitability for garden cultivation, and origin of common and scientific names.  -University of South Carolina Press

  • Revels Sunshine Paradise

    Sunshine Paradise: A History of Florida Tourism

    by Tracy J. Revels
    Professor of History
    University Press of Florida
    (2011)

    "An enlightening journey through Florida’s diverse and evolving tourism history, illustrating the changing face of tourism over the years, and how Floridians have coped with these changes. An informative look at Florida’s past efforts to woo tourists, and the mixed blessings that tourism has brought to the Sunshine State."--Brian Rucker, author of Image and Reality. "At last--a readable, concise history of Florida tourism from the earliest European discovery to the present. Revels’s prose sizzles. Her ability to summarize and analyze more than 300 years of Florida tourism in just over 200 pages is truly stunning. It is a remarkable achievement. Sunshine Paradise both entertains and informs on every page, and it should be required reading for policy makers and everyone else who needs to know how current Florida came to be."--James M. Denham, professor of history and director, Lawton M. Chiles Jr., Center for Florida History, Florida Southern College. For nearly two hundred years, Floridians have eagerly exploited tourism as the key to economic prosperity. As a result, the state has constantly reshaped and remodeled itself as different types of tourist heavens, and many aspects of its history have become inseparable from the fantastic images created by the tourism industry. From spa retreats to nature preserves, from riverboat rides to roller coasters, and from railroads to theme parks, the state’s dependence on tourism has greatly shaped its identity. Sunshine Paradise is the first book to focus exclusively on how--and why--tourism came to define Florida. Offering a concise look at the subject from the 1820s to the present, Tracy Revels demonstrates tourism’s relevance to all other major aspects of Florida history, including the Civil War, the land boom, and civil rights. In this enjoyable and well-written history, Revels shows how Florida’s tourism industry has remained adaptive and expansive, ready to sell the next version of paradise to northerners hungry for sunshine. She also explains why the state’s business and political leaders must consider the history of tourism development as they plan for the state’s future. Tracy J. Revels, professor and chair of history at Wofford College, is the author of Grander in Her Daughters: Florida’s Women during the Civil War 

  • Revels Shadowfall

    Shadowfall: A Novel of Sherlock Holmes

    by Tracy J. Revels
    Professor of History
    MX Publishing
    (2011)

    For Dr. Tracy Revels, professor of history at Wofford College, two plans came together simultaneaously this spring. She is author of a worthy addition to the Florida Hsitory and Culture Series of University Press of Florida titled "Sunshine Paradise" and she has also published an intriguing Sherlock Holmes novel, "Shadowfall." Revels has shared the works of Arthur Conan Doyle with Wofford students over the years, during interim projects as well as extra-curricular gatherings. She crafted "Shadowfall" one summer during the Wofford Community of Scholars, weaving together a tale of mystery and the occult that begins when sacred relics and mystical objects all over London begin disappearing. Sherlock Holmes must call on more than his powers of deduction to solve a mystery that threatens the safety of the British Empire and Doctor Watson's soul.

  • Grander In Her Daughters

    Grander in her Daughters: Flordia's Women During the Civil War

    by Tracy J. Revels
    Associate Professor and Department Chair of History
    University of South Carolina Press
    (2004)

    Though the women of Florida suffered Civil War traumas and privations commensurate with women throughout the Confederacy, few of their experiences have become part of the historical record. With Grander in Her Daughters: Florida’s Women during the Civil War Tracy J. Revels rescues from neglect these women and the challenges they faced. Drawing largely on primary source discoveries, Revels recounts the experiences of wives and widows, Unionists and secessionists, black female slaves and their plantation mistresses, business owners and refugees. Revels finds that no matter their political allegiance, these women lived dual lives, divided in their loyalties between what they often perceived as the competing interests of their nation and their families."The story of women in Civil War Florida is either untold or mythologized. In this finely crafted and engaging social portrait of Florida’s women during the Civil War, Tracy J. Revels fills this void. Revels’s compelling narrative, drawn largely from underutilized manuscript materials, offers general readers and scholars vivid images of Florida’s Civil War home front through the eyes of its women."—James M. Denham, Department of History, Florida Southern College, and coeditor of Echoes from a Distant Frontier: The Brown Sisters’ Correspondence from Antebellum Florida.

  • Watery Eden

    Watery Eden: A History of Walkulla Springs

    by Tracy J. Revels
    Associate Professor and Department Chair of History
    Sentry Press
    (2004)

    "Walkulla Springs is a crossroads, a place where man and nature have been meeting for a thousand years," writes Revels in Watery Eden. "Hopefully, man is a little better for the experience..."Author Revels shows a special adeptness in describing the earliest European visitors and many attempts to exploit the springs for profit.  She clearly has done her homework as evidenced by numerous newspaper and journal excerpts and firsthand interviews. Revels writes with an active voice, and the book reads like an entertaining saga.  Plus, vintage photographs are interspersed throughout the pages. Proceeds from the sale of the book enhance park activities.-Doug Alderson

  • Great Britain

    The History of Great Britain

    by Anne B Rodrick
    Associate Professor of History
    Greenwood Press
    (2004)

    The very idea of "Britain" has changed with the gain and loss of empire, the assimilation and devolution of various portions of the country, and the introduction and then dismantling of a welfare state that was nothing short of revolutionary in the wake of World War II. This volume provides an introduction to the history and culture of a nation that just a century ago was the world's leading imperial power and today is striving to reestablish its place as an international leader. The fortunes of that nation are outlined, describing its development from the days of Roman rule through the most recent events of Tony Blair's prime ministership. Rodrick introduces many important issues in Great Britain's history and also provides the reader with an overview of contemporary British society, from the intricacies of parliamentary politics to the cultural significance of church and crown. Includes a biographical section highlighting famous figures in British history, a timeline of important historical events, and a short bibliographical essay with suggestions for further reading.

  • Self Help And Civic Culture

    Self-Help and Civic Culture: Citizenship in Victorian Birmingham

    by Anne B. Rodrick
    Associate Professor of History
    Ashgate Publishing
    (2004)

    The nineteenth century witnesses a flowering of the culture and self-improvement that was reflected in a plethora of institutes, societies and journals that sprang up across Britain with the goal of spreading knowledge and learning to a wide spectrum of society. The prophets of self-improvement believed that not only was self-improvement a laudable goal in its own right, but more importantly it would contribute towards a general improvement in society.Focusing on the city of Birmingham, and drawing on both local and national sources, this study by Professor Rodrick explores the changing nature of self-improvement and citizenship in Victorian Britain. By approaching the concept of citizenship from a new perspective, provincial identity and its relationship to wider ideas of 'Englishness' and 'Britishness,' a distinct ideal of citizenship is elucidated that adds further nuance to the current scholarship.By drawing together various issues of citizenship, self-improvement, class and political power, this work brings a new perspective to the on-going attempts to determine who could claim the full rights, duties and responsibilities of the larger social body, thus illuminating the relationship between culture and power in nineteenth century England.-Ashgate Publishing

  • The Arts Entwined

    The Arts Entwined: Music and Painting in the Nineteenth Century

    by edited by Marsha L. Morton and Peter L. Schmunk
    Professor of Art History and Fine Arts Department Chair
    Garland Publishing
    (2000)

    This collection of essays by musicologists and art historians explores the reciprocal influences between music and painting during the nineteenth century, a critical period of gestation when instrumental music was identified as the paradigmatic expressive art and theoretically aligned with painting in the formulation ut pictura musica (as with music, so with painting). Under music's influence, painting approached the threshold of abstraction; concurrently many composers cultivated pictorial effects in their music. Individual essays address such themes as visualization in music, the literary vs. pictorial basis of the symphonic poem, musical pictorialism in painting and lithography, and the influence of Wagner on the visual arts. In these and other ways, both composers and painters actively participated in interarts discourses in seeking to redefine the very identity and aims of their art.  -Garland Publishing

  • Global Issues

    Global Issues: An Introduction

    by John L. Seitz
    Professor Emeritus of Government
    Blackwell Publishers
    (2007)

    This book is an introduction to the causes, meaning and possible outcomes of some of the central issues of modern times.  Population growth, hunger, poverty, species extinction, climate change, resource depletion, deforestation and the misuse of technology are among those discussed in length. (The third edition of this book was printed in 2007.)The author describes the nature of world problems in both qualitative and quantitative terms. He shows that single problems never have single causes, that local issues frequently have global implications, and, further, that attempts to solve one (employment, for example) may often give rise to others (such as air and water pollution).  Indeed, he points out, it is all too often the case that problems arise from the economic progress and development it was hoped would put an end to them.  -Blackwell Publishers

  • Discrete Math for Comp Sci

    Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science

    by Angela B. Shiflet
    Larry Hearn McCalla Professor and Department Chair of Computer Science
    West Group
    (1986)

     

  • Data Structures with Pascal

    Elementary Data Structures with Pascal: A Second Course in Computer Programming

    by Angela B. Shiflet
    Larry Hearn McCalla Professor and Department Chair of Computer Science
    West Group
    (1989)

     

  • Problem Solving in C

    Problem Solving in C Including Breadth and Labratories

    by Angela B. Shiflet
    Larry Hearn McCalla Professor and Department Chair of Computer Science
    Brooks/Cole
    (1995)

    This introductory computer science text offers breadth sections on computer science theory and contains an integrated lab manual with code that students can manipulate.  -Brooks/Cole

  • Data Structures in C++

    Data Structures in C++ Including Breadth and Laboratories

    by Angela B. Shiflet
    Larry Hearn McCalla Professor and Department Chair of Computer Science
    West Group
    (1996)

    Data Structures in C++ Including Breadth and Laboratories integrates laboratory exercises, problem-solving skills, and breadth sections covering non-programming aspects of computer science into the study of data structures. An appendix on non-object-oriented features of C++ helps students froma C background get up to speed, and Chapter 4 presents the aspects of OOP in C++ that students need in studying data structures. Other aids to learning include Programming Projects, over 1,000 exercises, and numerous figures. Laboratory programs and data files, data structure implementations, and program examples from the text are available via the World Wide Web.  -West Group

  • Problem Solving In C++

    Problem Solving in C++ Including Breadth and Laboratories

    by Angela B. Shiflet
    Larry Hearn McCalla Professor and Department Chair of Computer Science
    Brooks/Cole; 2nd edition - Thomson Brooks/Cole
    (1998; 2004)

    This text introduces the beginning computer science student to the analysis, design, implementation, testing, and debugging of programs using ANSI C++, and to the breadth and richness of the computer science discipline. With ample use of examples and figures, the authors present material in a clear, visual manner. The introduction to object-oriented programming (OOP), which begins early in the text, is gradual and natural. Chapter 3 starts covering encapsulation with objects and use of classes, and Chapter 4 shows students how to define methods. Offering a wonderful hands-on introduction to many features of problem solving in C++, each chapter concludes with a laboratory section that is integrated with the topics in the text. Throughout the text, twenty-two discrete "breadth" sections present a broad range of topics in computer science. Students develop problem solving ability, programming skill, and an appreciation for the discipline of computer science.  -Thomson Brooks/Cole

  • Introduction To Computer Science

    Introduction to Computational Science

    by Angela B. Shiflet and George W. Shiflet
    Dr. and Mrs. Larry Hearn McCalla Professor and Department Chair of Computer Science/ Dr. and Mrs. Larry Hearn McCalla Professor and Department Chair of Biology
    Princeton University Press
    (2006)

    Computational science is a quickly emerging field at the intersection of the sciences, computer science, and mathematics because much scientific investigation now involves computing as well as theory and experiment. However, limited educational materials exist in this field. Introduction to Computational Science fills this void with a flexible, readable textbook that assumes only a background in high school algebra and enables instructors to follow tailored pathways through the material. It is the first textbook designed specifically for an introductory course in the computational science and engineering curriculum.The text embraces two major approaches to computational science problems: System dynamics models with their global views of major systems that change with time; and cellular automaton simulations with their local views of how individuals affect individuals. While the text is generic, an extensive author-generated Web-site contains tutorials and files in a variety of software packages to accompany the text. Generic software approach in the textWeb site with tutorials and files in a variety of software packagesEngaging examples, exercises, and projects that explore scienceAdditional, substantial projects for students to develop individually or in teamsConsistent application of the modeling processQuick review questions and answersProjects for students to develop individually or in teamsReference sections for most modules, as well as a glossaryOnline instructor's manual with a test bank and solutions

  • ThesePeopleAreUs

    These People Are Us: Stories

    by George Singleton
    John C. Cobb Professor of Humanities
    Mariner Books
    (2002)

    Once you start reading George Singleton's eagerly awaited first book of stories, a strange thing happens: You discover that the characters sound like people you know--people who are trying hard to make sense of modern absurdities.With a style all his own, Singleton fashions a world that wins our hearts but teases our senses: how to find a black-market sonogram so your pregnant wife won't find out you accidentally taped over the original; how to help your father and everyone else in town fake being hit by a tornado to get emergency government funds; and why not to look for your next wife at your local recycling center.Step into Singleton's world and you'll see why he is earning a reputation as one of the funniest, wisest, and most surprising Southern writers of his generation--and why he was named one of the "new writers you need to know" by Book Magazine.

  • HalfMammalsOfDixie

    The Half-Mammals of Dixie

    by George Singleton
    John C. Cobb Professor of Humanities
    A Shannon Ravenel Book
    (2002)

    George Singleton, who's had many stories published in the best literary journals, has recently burst into the big time with appearances in Playboy, Zoetrope, The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's Magazine and Book. The stories in his new collection are wild and wooly - or maybe we should say wild and half-wooly. In any case, they're definitely not for the creationist crowd or for the laughter impaired.Off-the-wall. But also utterly believable and written with tremendous affection for the people and their place-a place called Forty-Five, part of the contemporary South that's far removed from big city Atlanta or proper Charleston and, in fact, much like Singleton's own hometown of Dacusville, South Carolina. As he says of his characters, "They're regular people just trying to get by. Most of them aren't jaded by everyday life, though perhaps they should have been long ago. There are some with physical and mental limitations, but I hope all of them have heart."They do indeed, just like their stories.

  • WhyDogsChaseCars

    Why Dogs Chase Cars: Tales of Beleaguered Boyhood

    by George Singleton
    John C. Cobb Professor of Humanities
    A Shannon Ravenel Book
    (2004)

    These fourteen funny stories tell the tale of a beleaguered boyhood down home where the dogs still run loose. As a boy growing up in the tiny backwater town of Forty-Five, South Carolina (where everybody is pretty much one beer short of a six-pack), all Mendal Dawes wants is out. It's not just his hometown that's hopeless. Mendal's father is just as bad. Embarrassing his son to death nearly every day, Mr. Dawes is a parenting guide's bad example. He buries stuff in the backyard—fake toxic barrels, imitation Burma Shave signs (BIRD ON A WIRE, BIRD ON A PERCH, FLY TOWARD HEAVEN, FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH), yardstick collections. He calls Mendal "Fuzznuts" and makes him recite Marx and Durkheim daily and befriend a classmate rumored to have head lice. Mendal Dawes is a boy itching to get out of town, to take the high road and leave the South and his dingbat dad far behind—just like those car-chasing dogs.But bottom line, this funky, sometimes outrageous, and always very human tale is really about how Mendal discovers that neither he nor the dogs actually want to catch a ride, that the hand that has fed them has a lot more to offer. On the way to watching that light dawn, we also get to watch the Dawes's precarious relationship with a place whose "gene pool [is] so shallow that it wouldn't take a Dr. Scholl's insert to keep one's soles dry."

  • DrowningGruel

    Drowning In Gruel

    by George Singleton
    John C. Cobb Professor of Humanities
    Mariner Books
    (2006)

    Acclaimed short-story master George Singleton follows the lives and schemes of the citizens of fictitious Gruel, South Carolina, in search of glory, seclusion, money, revenge, and a meaningful existence. In these nineteen tales, young Gruelites learn lessons when confronted with neighbors who might not be as blind as they appear, dermatologists intent on eradicating birthmarks, and fathers prone to driving on half-inflated tires in order to flirt with cashiers. Meanwhile, the town's older citizens try to make sense out of dogs that heal wounds, lawn-mowing dead men, wives who don't appreciate gas masks for Valentine's Day, and children who mix their mother's ashes with housepaint. Hilarious and tragic, George Singleton's unforgettable characters try to overcome their limitations as best they can.

  • Novel

    Novel

    by George Singleton
    John C. Cobb Professor of Humanities
    Mariner Books
    (2006)

    Set in the town of Gruel, South Carolina, this first novel by George Singleton, master of the comic short story, is the tale of a young man named Novel (his brother's name is James; his sister's is Joyce), a professional snake handler who stumbles across strange doings while he sits in a motel room writing his autobiography. As he struggles to recount his life story, he uncovers-and finds himself starring in-a decades-old town secret, one that can blow him and his fellow citizens sky-high. Funny as only George Singleton can be, full of Southern mischief and wit, Novel is a crazed and crazy fictional whirlwind of drinking, motel-living, art-forgery-committing, pool-playing redneck charm.

  • PepTalks

    Pep Talks, Warnings, and Screeds: Indispensable Wisdom and Cautionary Advice for Writeres

    by George Singleton
    John C. Cobb Professor of Humanities
    Writers Digest
    (2008)

    Toddlers—and drunks—bang around hitting walls, tables, chairs, the floor, and other people, trying to find their legs. Writing fiction is a similar process. Sometimes it might take a while before the story gets some balance and moves forward. Sometimes the story takes off as if motor-driven, then crashes into something not foreseen or expected. Learning to be a writer is all about finding your legs, and doing your best to convince onlookers that you know what you're doing and where you're going.In Pep Talks, Warnings & Screeds, acclaimed Southern story writer and novelist George Singleton serves up everything you ever need to know to become a real writer (meaning one who actually writes), in bite-sized aphorisms. It's Nietzsche's Beyond Good & Evil meets Anne Lamott's Bird by Bird. It's cough syrup that tastes like chocolate cake. In other words, don't expect to get better unless you get a good dose of it, maybe two.Accompanied by more than fifty original full-color illustrations by novelist Daniel Wallace, these laugh-out-loud funny, candid, and surprisingly useful lessons will help you find your own writerly balance so you can continue to move forward.

  • WorkShirtsForMadmen

    Work Shirts for Madmen

    by George Singleton
    John C. Cobb Professor of Humanities
    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
    (2008)

    Renegade artist Harp Spillman is lower than a bow-legged fire ant. Because of an unhealthy relationship with the bottle, he’s ruined his reputation as one of the South’s preeminent commissioned metal sculptors. And his desperate turn to ice sculpting might’ve led to a posse of angry politicians on his trail. With the help of his sane and practical potter wife, Raylou, Harp understands that it’s time to return to the mig welder. Yes, it’s time to prove that he can complete a series of twelve-foot-high metal angels—welded completely out of hex nuts—for the city of Birmingham. Is it pure chance that the Elbow Boys, their arms voluntarily fused so they can’t drink, show up in order to help Harp out in a variety of ways? And why did his neighbor smuggle anteaters into desolate Ember Glow? Is it true that there’s no free will?

  • StrayDecorum

    Stray Decorum

    by George Singleton
    John C. Cobb Professor of Humanities
    Dzanc Books
    (2012)

    Eleven stories, all previously published in journals like The Atlantic, Oxford American, and The Georgia Review, in which George Singleton brings small-town South Carolina alive. Using everyday situations like a dog needing its annual vaccination and buckets of humorous observations, Singleton pokes and prods his readers into realizing we're all simply restless for a pat on the head.

  • Between Wrecks

    Between Wrecks

    by George Singleton
    John C. Cobb Professor of Humanities
    Dzanc Books
    (2014)

    There’s a place just down the way where a trip to the salvage yard reveals infidelity and theft. There’s another where an unlicensed entomologist celebrates his freedom with a compulsive liar while a manhunt ensues on the streets outside. Places where a con man and his nephew sell stolen parachutes to veterans in case the ground beneath them should suddenly give way and where Chuck Norris’s face graces only the walls of the finest trailers. A place where tongues get left in rental cars and a place where everyone insists an absolute stranger is your boyhood friend.Between Wrecks takes readers on a raucous bar crawl through an America both startlingly familiar and hilariously absurd, examining paranoia, fear, relentless “truths,” longstanding personal habits gone awry, and what it means to look toward a horizon that may or may not be a mirage.

  • Network Troubleshooting Tools

    Network Troubleshooting Tools

    by Joseph D. Sloan
    Professor of Computer Science
    O'Reilly and Associates
    (2001)

    Network Troubleshooting Tools does the work for you--by describing the best of the freely available tools for debugging and troubleshooting. You can start with a lesser-known version of ping that diagnoses connectivity problems, or take on a much more comprehensive program like MRTG for graphing traffic through network interfaces. There's tkined for mapping and automatically monitoring networks, and Ethereal for capturing packets and debugging low-level problems.This book isn't just about the tools available for troubleshooting common network problems. It also outlines a systematic approach to network troubleshooting: how to document your network so you know how it behaves under normal conditions, and how to think about problems when they arise, so you can solve them more effectively.-O'Reilly and Associates

  • Stone Campus History Series

    Wofford College: The Campus History Series

    by Dr. Phillip Stone
    Archivist
    Arcadia Publishing
    (2010)

    Visitors to bookstores throughout the region are familiar with the Campus History series produced by Arcadia Publishing in Charleston, S.C. and other cities. Dr. Phillip Stone '94, college archivist, has created a very fine Wofford entry for this series that nicely complements previous college histories and memoirs, including "Shining with Untarnished Honor" (2005), which Stone coauthored with Doyle Boggs '70 and JoAnn Mitchell Brasington '89. A remarkable feature of this book are dozens of very fine photographic images from the Wofford archives, the result of Stone's patient and skilled work with the scanner combined with good quality printing. Readers will be seeing most of these pictures for the first time in recent memory, and they are explained by accurate and interesting captions. A brief, well written introduction covers the important events in college history. The book is dedicated to the memory of Herbert Hucks Jr. '34 (1913-1999), who distinguished himself as a librarian, historian and archivist for both Wofford College and South Carolina United Methodist Church. Stone's book is available a Ben Wofford Books, many South Carolina stores, and on the internet.

  • Object Oriented Software

    Object-Oriented Software Development: Engineering Software for Reuse

    by John D. McGregor and David A. Sykes
    Professor of Computer Science
    International Thomson Computer Press
    (1992)

    Based on a 3-day course McGregor developed for Bell Labs. The text tries to do three things in a relatively few pages: give an intro to OO concepts and languages, present a (new) full lifecycle software methodology, and provide a reading-knowledge introduction to C++.

  • A Practical Guide to Testing Object Oriented Software

    A Practical Guide to Testing Object-Oriented Software

    by John D. McGregor and David A. Sykes
    Professor of Computer Science
    Addison Wesley
    (2001)

    A Practical Guide to Testing Object-Oriented Software focuses on the real-world issues that arise in planning and implementing effective testing for object-oriented and component-based software development. It shows how testing object-oriented software differs from testing procedural software and highlights the unique challenges and opportunities inherent in object-oriented software testing.The authors reveal how object-oriented software development allows testing to be integrated into each stage of the process-from defining requirements to system integration-resulting in a smoother development process and a higher end quality. As they follow this process, they describe what to test at each stage as well as offer experienced-based testing techniques.  -Addison Wesley

  • The Shuffle of Wings

    The Shuffle of Wings

    by Deno Trakas
    Professor of English
    Holocene Publishing
    (1990)

    A chapbook of poems set at home and abroad, primarily in Spain, with a variety of voices asking questions of faith and commitment.

  • New Southern Harmonies

    New Southern Harmonies

    by Deno Trakas
    Chair of English Department and Hoy Professor of Literature
    Hub City Writing Project
    (1998)

    The range of styles and subjects in these stories is as diverse as the landscape of the Palmetto State--from the offbeat humor of George Singleton's Outlaw Head and Tail, to the piercing passion of Rosa Shand's Density of Sunlight, to the sprawling, strange drama of Scott Gould's Nothing Fazes the Autopilot, to the unexpected twists of Deno Trakas's Eugene.While all these storyteller share the same home--upstate South Carolina--they do not share the same view of the world, and they have vastly different imaginations. Inside these pages are philosophers and barkeeps, movie-makers and artists, airplane pilots and eccentric great-aunts, love-struck teens and 40-something hoopsters. There are characters confronting race, defying convention, and exploring the meaning of love. Settings range from the "semi-jungle" of Uganda to the imaginary world of Christ Almighty, North Carolina; along the way, there are vine-covered Southern homesteads, damp campgrounds, and ubiquitous suburban malls. There's even a house at the bottom of a lake.  Awarded the Independent Publishers Award for the best short fiction collection in the US & Canada.  -Hub City Writers Project 

  • Human and Puny

    human & puny

    by Poems by Deno P. Trakas; Monochrome watercolors by Irene Trakas
    Professor of English
    Holocene Publishing
    (2001)

    This unique collaboration between brother and sister compassionately measures the smallness of human lives and explores the crawlspace of human relationships. These twenty poems and twenty drawings speak to each other and to us about the confidences of love, death and transcendence.

  • International Dimensions

    International Dimensions of Authoritarian Persistence: Lessons from Post-Soviet States

    by Dr. Rachel J. Vanderhill and Michael E. Aleprete Jr.
    Assistant Professor of History
    Lexington Books
    (2013)

    While the international system has been evolving in an increasingly liberal direction, the level of democratic practice within the post-Soviet region has, on the whole, declined. Two decades after the popular uprisings against communism, many governments in the region have successfully blunted both popular and international pressures for democratic consolidation. Each selection in this volume explores how international factors interact with domestic conditions to explain the persistence of authoritarianism throughout the region. The selections in the volume cover several countries, including Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, South Ossetia, Ukraine, Moldova, and Belarus; special attention is paid to the Russian Federation since it is both a member of the region and acts as an external actor influencing the political development of its neighbors. This volume is especially relevant as the world again experiences the surprising overthrow of long-running authoritarian regimes. The failure of democratic consolidation among post-Soviet states offers important lessons for policymakers and academics dealing with the recent wave of political transitions in the Middle East and Asia.

  • Promoting Authoritarianism Abroad

    Promoting Authoritarianism Abroad

    by Dr. Rachel J. Vanderill
    Assistant Professor of History
    Lynne Rienner Publishers
    (2013)

    Recent years have seen efforts by several states to promote authoritarianism abroad, garnering the attention of foreign policy analysts - and raising a number of questions. What determines the success or failure of these efforts? How does the relationship between international and domestic politics play out? Do states comply with external pressures for ideological reasons, or primarily to attain material benefits? How does promoting authoritarianism differ from promoting democracy? Addressing these questions, Rachel Vanderhill draws on the experiences of Russia, Venezuela and Iran to provide an illuminating comparative analysis.

  • Welchel

    Reading, Learning, Teaching Howard Zinn

    by Ed Welchel
    Associate Professor and Chair of Education
    Peter Lang
    (2009)

    Howard Zinn is one of the most celebrated historians and social activists of our time. Raised in a working class family in Brooklyn, he was a shipyard worker and union organizer when World War II began. He served as a bombadier in the European Theatre and this experience shaped his opposition to war as an instrument of foreign policy. He became active in the civil rights movement as well as the anti-war movement from the 1950s to the 1970s. He is perhaps best known as the author of A People's History of the United States, published in 1980. This study of Zinn's life and work opens the door to many aspects of historical study generally untouched in traditional secondary and collegiate survey courses in United States history. To Zinn, history is not an objective account of the past to be indelibly carved into the brains of American citizens; rather, history is an ever-changing palette of events as people react to the contexts and cultures they find themselves immersed in. By considering the lives and thoughts of less politically and socially prominent individuals, students have the opportunity to re-examine their own beliefs and assumptions about contemporary American life. Students will gain insight into how history is constructed and recorded through a consideration of the life and writings of Howard Zinn.