Students studying outside the library

February events at Wofford

Black History Month events, lectures, theatre performances, art exhibit highlight month
 

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An art exhibition by Jessica Scott-Felder, assistant professor of art and art history, “Three-Point Perspective: Conversations in Imagination, Legend and Science,” is on exhibit Feb. 6 through March 31 in the Richardson Family Art Gallery in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts.
2018-01-31

SPARTANBURG, S.C. – February events at Wofford College are highlighted by guest lectures, Wofford Theatre performances and a variety of art exhibitions.

All events listed are open to the public and are free of charge unless otherwise noted. 

Please check the online calendar at the calendar.wofford.edu for frequent updates. For athletics events, please go to athletics.wofford.edu.

For more information, contact Laura Corbin at woffordnews@wofford.edu or 864-597-4180.

Tuesday, Feb. 6
Black History Month Event
Spike Lee Movie Night: “School Daze”
7 p.m., Meadors Multicultural House, Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village

At historically black Mission College, the activist-minded Dap (Larry Fishburne) immerses himself in a world of political rhetoric and social movements. He hopes that one day he can rally the students as a united front. At the other end of the spectrum, Julian (Giancarlo Esposito), the head of the largest fraternity on campus, is more concerned with maintaining a strict social order. In between, Dap's conflicted cousin, Half-Pint (Spike Lee), spends most of his time rushing the fraternity. (Fandango.com). (Open to Wofford campus community only.)
Sponsored by Wofford Women of Color

Thursday, Feb. 8
Black History Month Event
Black and Abroad
5:30 p.m., Center for Community-Based Learning, Michael S. Brown Village Center

At this informational event for students of color interested in study abroad and/or international travel, current Wofford students and community members who have traveled/studied abroad will share their insights and advice on the black/African-American experience overseas. Food will be provided. (Open to Wofford campus community only.)
Sponsored by Office of International Programs, Office of Diversity and Inclusion and Presidential Committee on Diversity and Inclusion

Friday, Feb. 9
Paint & Pour
6 p.m., Anna Todd Wofford Center, Andrews Field House

(Open to Wofford campus community only.)
Sponsored by Association of Multicultural Students

Monday, Feb. 12
Black History Month Event
“All Hail the King: The Black Panther and Blackness in American Superhero Comics”
Speaker: Dr. Dwain Pruitt ’95, University of Louisville
5:30 p.m., Anna Todd Wofford Center, Andrews Field House

Dr. Dwain Pruitt, a 1995 Wofford graduate and assistant dean of curriculum and governance at the University of Louisville, will discuss Black Panther, the first African superhero in comics. Marvel's Black Panther debuted in 1966 and became modern comics' first recurring black character. Learn more about the King of the Wakandas - and the black superhero's journey - in advance of Marvel Studios' upcoming "Black Panther" film release.
Sponsored by Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Department of History, Department of Art History and Studio Art

Tuesday, Feb. 13
Black History Month Event
Wofford Unfiltered
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. presents "Wofford Unfiltered," focusing on micro-aggressions and covert racism faced by students of color on campus. Stories from Wofford community members will be read and assessed by the attendees during the event. (Open to Wofford campus community only.)
Sponsored by Kappa Alpha Psi

Wednesday, Feb. 14
“The Future of Afrofuturism”
Speaker: Ingrid LaFleur, cultural producer and arts advocate; panel discussion with Dr. Cassandra L. Jones, University of South Carolina Upstate
7 p.m., Jerome Johnson Richardson Theatre, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts

Ingrid LaFleur is a cultural producer, arts advocate, pleasure activist, founder of AFROTOPIA and former candidate for mayor of Detroit. LaFleur has developed and organized art exhibitions nationally and internationally with a curatorial focus on Afrofuturism. Notable presentations include: Centre Pompidou (Paris), Bucknell University (Lewisburg, Pa.); TEDxBrooklyn; TEDxDetroit; Iwalewahaus at the University of Bayreuth (Bayreuth, Germany); Ideas City, New Museum (New York); AfroTech Conference (Dortmund, Germany); and Black in Design at Harvard University. In 2013, LaFleur, based in Detroit, Mich., founded AFROTOPIA, an evolving creative research project that investigates the possibilities of using the arts movement Afrofuturism as psychosocial healing. She explores ideas around historical traumas, myth-making, transcendence and the role of spirit science and technology within Black American socio-political movement. Dr. Cassandra L. Jones is an assistant professor of African American studies and director of the African American Studies Program at the University of South Carolina Upstate. Her research in Afrofuturism sits at the intersection of race, gender, technology and speculative fiction and moves along two vectors: post-colonial identity and metaphors of technology in Afrofuturist texts. She has published in the Journal of Teaching and Learning with technology and edited a collection, “The Child in Post-Apocalyptic Cinema.” She also has written an essay for a special edition of Frontier dedicated to Women Digitizing Revolution. Presented by African/African-American Studies Program and Department of Art and Art History. This event is presented in conjunction with the art exhibition “Three-Point Perspective: Conversations in Imagination, Legend and Science” by Jessica Scott-Felder, assistant professor of art and art history at Wofford, Feb. 6 through March 31 in the Richardson Family Art Gallery in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. (See description of the exhibition under Gallery and Museum Exhibitions below.)

Thursday, Feb. 15
“Pleasure is the Ultimate Rebellion: Manifesting the Impossible”
Speaker: Ingrid LaFleur, cultural producer and arts advocate
11 a.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
(See Feb. 14 event for biographical information on Ingrid LaFleur.)
Sponsored by African/African-American Studies Program

Thursday, Feb. 15
Chinese New Year Celebration
5-7 p.m., Burwell Dining Hall, Burwell Building

The Chinese New Year is the most important holiday in China, East Asia and other places around the world. This year, the Chinese New Year falls on Feb. 16. Wofford will celebrate the Year of the Dog with Chinese food, performances, hands-on activities, prizes and more.

Thursday, Feb. 15
Latin American Guitar with Dr. John Akers
6 p.m., Richardson Family Art Museum, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts

Dr. John Akers, associate professor in the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, will present selections of Latin American music for guitar. The event is in conjunction with the exhibition “Spanish Colonial and Religious Art” through April 7 in the Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level. (See description of the exhibition under Gallery and Museum Exhibitions below.)

Thursday, Feb. 15
Opening Reception and Artist’s Talk: “Three-Point Perspective: Conversations in Imagination, Legend and Science”
Speaker: Artist Jessica Scott-Felder, assistant professor of art and art history
7 p.m., Richardson Family Art Gallery, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts

Jessica Scott-Felder’s exhibition “Three-Point Perspective: Conversations in Imagination, Legend and Science” is on exhibit Feb. 6 through March 31 in the Richardson Family Art Gallery in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Sponsored by African/African-American Studies Program
(See description of exhibition under Gallery and Museum Exhibitions below.)

Monday, Feb. 19
Black History Month Event
Race and Mental Health
5:30 p.m., Anna Todd Wofford Center, Andrews Field House

More than 42 million people in the U.S. deal with various forms of mental illness and its effects on their activities each and every day. Many stigmas and risks surround mental health, specifically within marginalized communities and identities. This discussion will be led by professional counselors.
Sponsored by Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Saturday, Feb. 20
Black History Month Event
Black Panther Movie Showing
6:05 p.m. and 7 p.m. showings
NCG Theater, 1985 E. Main St., Spartanburg

The Black Student Alliance is giving away 20 tickets for the latest installment of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Black Panther. During each event throughout Black History Month, students may enter the drawing; the more events they attend, the more entries they may have. One ticket per student. Contact the Office of Diversity and Inclusion for more details.
Sponsored by Office of Diversity and Inclusion and Black Student Alliance

Tuesday, Feb. 20
Distinguished MENA Guest Lecture: “The Life of Muhammad”
Speaker: Kecia Ali, Boston University
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Kecia Ali, professor of Islamic studies at Boston University, will present the Wofford Distinguished MENA Guest Lecture on “The Life of Muhammad.” The lecture is sponsored by the International and Foreign Language Education (IFLE) Office of the U.S. Department of Education in partnership with the Middle East and North African (MENA) Studies Program at Wofford.

Wednesday, Feb. 21
Black History Month Event
Malcolm X Visual
All day, various locations around campus

Pictures and quotes from and about Malcolm X will be posted around Wofford's campus throughout the day.
Sponsored by Wofford Women of Color 

Wednesday, Feb. 21
Black History Month Event
MLK Unity Week Keynote
Speaker: Dr. Darris Means, University of Georgia
6 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

The MLK Unity Week Keynote, rescheduled from January because of inclement weather, will be delivered by Dr. Darris Means, assistant professor in the Department of Counseling and Human Development Services at the University of Georgia. Means, a Spartanburg native, conducts research on diversity, inclusion and equity. A reception will follow the lecture. Co-sponsored by Converse College Community and Inclusion and Wofford’s Presidential Committee on Diversity and Inclusion, the Office of Greek Life and the Office of the Provost.

Thursday, Feb. 22
LGBTQIA Student Ally Training (Students only event)
11 a.m., Mezzanine in the Center for Community-Based Learning, Michael S. Brown Village Center
This student workshop promotes awareness and understanding about the issues surrounding the LGBTQIA community. Lunch for student attendees, including vegetarian options, will be provided. To attend, RSVP to Dylan Lawing, resident director at lawingdr@wofford.edu by Feb 20.
Sponsored by Office of Diversity and Inclusion and Presidential Committee on Diversity and Inclusion.

Thursday, Feb. 22
Black History Month Event
Food for Thought with Alisha Sweatt
6 p.m., McMillian Theater, Campus Life Building

Hip Hop is more than just music; it's a way for various identify groups to have a voice and share their experiences through a unique art form. Alisha Sweatt, founder of Hip Hop Makes Me Feel, will discuss "Food for Thought." She will concentrate on lyrics and different types of rap under Hip Hop. The audience will be able to share their opinions on Mumble Rap and participate in the game "Trash or Dope," voting on songs played.
Sponsored by Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Monday, Feb. 26
Black History Month Event
Humans of Wofford Series, featuring Nneka Mogbo ’20
6 p.m., Gray-Jones Room, Burwell Building

Nneka Mogbo, a Wofford junior, will discuss her story of her transition from her homeland of Nigeria to the United States.
Sponsored by Office of Diversity and Inclusion and Association of Multicultural Students

Tuesday, Feb. 27
Women in Law and Politics
11 a.m., Jerome Johnson Richardson Theatre, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts

Recent revelations in national politics, the entertainment industry and the legal profession have illustrated just some of the difficult challenges that many women face in professional life, even into the 21st century. This event provides a candid conversation about the difficulties and achievements of women today in the political and legal fields. Prema Samhat will moderate the discussion of the four panelists: Joyce Yette, managing director and general counsel, Promontory Financial; Lee Dunn, head of White House Strategy and Outreach for Google Inc.; Brooke Mueller, senior director for global government affairs for Walmart; and Ann Clark, counsel for Greenberg Traurig, LLP. Samhat is former director of Knox Community Hospital Foundation and former director of marketing and community relations for Knox Community Hospital in Mount Vernon, Ohio.

Tuesday, Feb. 27
Black History Month Event
Code Switching
11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Anna Todd Wofford Center, Andrews Field House

Who are you when the lights are off and there is no longer an audience? When are you not required to perform? Is there a difference between you and the character you play, or can you even tell the difference anymore? Join the conversation on code switching. (Open to Wofford campus community only.)
Sponsored by Office of Diversity and Inclusion and Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Tuesday, Feb. 27
Community Conversations: "Stand Up or Sit Down: The Debate Regarding the Anthem"
7 p.m., Anna Todd Wofford Center, Andrews Field House

Community Conversations is back with a new topic, "Stand Up or Sit Down," a conversation regarding the debate on the national anthem. Wofford students Monica Branch and Joanne Franklin will provide a brief history of our national anthem and will facilitate a discussion to get the opinions of campus leaders on the national issue. (Open to Wofford campus community only.)
Sponsored by Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Wednesday, Feb. 28
A Rebirth of a Nation
6 p.m., Anna Todd Wofford Center, Andrews Field House

The Black Student Alliance will debrief and discuss the importance of Marvel Studios' newest film, "Black Panthers." (Open to Wofford campus community only.)
Sponsored by Black Student Alliance

Wednesday, Feb. 28
Spike Lee Movie Night: "Bamboozled"
7 p.m., Meadors Multicultural House, Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village

"Bamboozled" is a blistering satire of network television's pitfalls and prejudices, a humorous look at how race, ratings and the pursuit of power lead to a television writer's stunning rise and tragic downfall. It's the story of Pierre Delacroix, a young, Harvard-educated man, who is the sole person of color writing for an upstart network with floundering ratings. Despite several attempts, Delacroix has yet to see any of his concepts go into production. (Open to Wofford campus community only.)
Sponsored by Wofford Women of Color

Wednesday, Feb. 28, through Saturday, March 3 (NOTE DATE CHANGE; NO PERFORMANCE ON TUESDAY, FEB. 27)
Wofford Theatre presents Sam Shepard’s “True West”
8 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday, Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
Wofford Theatre presents Sam Shepard’s “True West,” featuring performances by faculty members Mark Ferguson, assistant professor and chair of the Department of Theatre and director of Wofford Theatre, and Dan Day, assistant professor of theatre. It is directed by guest artist Daniel Murray, department chair of acting/movement at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities. “True West” is an intimate exploration of sibling rivalry and familial discord in the suburbs of Los Angeles. Turmoil bubbles just below the surface for brothers Austin and Lee as their aspirations clash and collide during a fateful weekend that will change their lives irrevocably. As lofty hopes turn to crushing blows, Austin and Lee ask themselves, is it possible to cling to an ideal of justice when the call of the lawless desert becomes impossible to resist? Discounted ticket prices are available through online sales at www.wofford.edu/boxoffice/: $3 for students, $10 for faculty/staff and $13 for the general public. Tickets at the door: $5 for students, $12 for faculty/staff and $15 for the general public. Students, faculty and staff must show their school/college IDs at the door.

GALLERY AND MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS:

Through Saturday, April 7
“Spanish Colonial and Religious Art”
Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts

Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 1-5 p.m.; Thursday, extended hours to 9 p.m.; Sunday-Monday, closed. Admission is free. The Richardson Family Art Museum and Richardson Family Art Gallery are part of the Spartanburg ArtWalk held on the third Thursday of each month from 5 to 9 p.m.
Exhibition description: The arrival of the Spanish to the Americas from the 15th century through the 19th century introduced Spanish beliefs and traditions to the regions, creating a new artistic tradition that evolved with the convergence of cultures. This influence can be seen through selected works on exhibit, on loan from the collection of Dr. Francis and Mrs. Lilly Robicsek of Charlotte, N.C. The exhibition includes a variety of oil paintings, such as “Santo Domingo Holding the Infant Jesus,” “Saint Martin Preaching to Native Americans” and “The Virgin of the Candlestick with Christ Child” as well as wood carvings such as “St. Michael Archangel” and other artifacts. The works showcase how religion was a major motivating factor in the Spanish settlement of the Americas, especially Mexico and Peru, the greatest focus of Spanish interest and the most outstanding regions for artistic production in the colonial period. From around the mid-17th century, if not earlier, local traditions began to develop quite independently of their European referents, and by the late 17th century, distinctive styles developed in metropolitan Mexico, Quito, Lima and Cuzco. Visual culture in the colonial period often was multivalent and dissonant, reflecting societies in which many ethnicities interacted.
Special related event:
Thursday, Feb. 15 – 6 p.m., Latin American Guitar by Dr. John Akers, associate professor in the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Richardson Family Art Museum

Through Saturday, Aug. 18
“Old Main: A Trip Down Memory Lane”
Martha Cloud Chapman Gallery, Campus Life Building
Hours: 7 a.m.-midnight daily

Exhibition description: “Old Main: A Trip Down Memory Lane” explores the visual history of Wofford College through Main Building, known affectionately as Old Main. Referred to as “The College” for many years, Old Main remains one of the nation’s outstanding examples of “Italianate” or “Tuscan Villa” architecture. The cornerstone of Old Main was laid with imposing Masonic rites on July 4, 1851. Construction finally began in the summer of 1852 under the supervision of Ephraim Clayton of Asheville, N.C. Skilled African-American carpenters executed uniquely beautiful masonry and woodwork, including a pulpit and pews for the chapel. The exterior of the building today is true to the original design, but the interior has been modernized and renovated three times – in the early 1900s, in the 1960s and in 2007. The selected archival and photographic prints as well as works on paper provide an opportunity to take a trip down memory lane to Wofford’s most famous landmark.

Thursday, Feb. 1, through Sunday, April 1
“Mingled Terrain” by Judith Kruger
Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts

Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 1-5 p.m.; Thursday, extended hours to 9 p.m.; Sunday-Monday, closed. Admission is free. The Richardson Family Art Museum and Richardson Family Art Gallery are part of the Spartanburg ArtWalk held on the third Thursday of each month from 5 to 9 p.m.
Exhibition description: Judith Kruger’s paintings, prints and mixed media works address human-environment connectivity. She is recognized internationally for her advocacy of historic, natural painting materials and historic, ecological processes. Her works are held in private, public and corporate collections around the country and the world.
Special related events:
Wednesday, March 14 – 7 p.m., Artist’s Lecture, Jerome Johnson Richardson Theatre
Thursday, March 15 – 7 p.m., Artist’s Talk, Richardson Family Art Museum
Exhibit and events are in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts.
March 19-23 – Abstract Alchemy: A Painting, Mixed Media Workshop with artist Judith Kruger, Goodall Environmental Studies Center, Glendale, S.C. Tuition: $700; Lab Fee: $170 (includes most supplies and equipment). Register at www.cullowheemountainarts.org or 828-342-6913

Monday, Feb. 5, through Thursday, May 31
“Wofford’s Literary Societies”
Sandor Teszler Library Gallery, Sandor Teszler Library

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-midnight; Friday 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.-midnight
Exhibition description: This exhibit examines the history and legacy of Wofford’s literary societies. In August 1854, the first literary society was created as a venue to practice skills such as debating, oratory, parliamentary procedure and writing. Three more societies had been formed by 1920. During the college’s first century, the societies were integral to student life – starting libraries, building the college portrait collection and starting three student publications. Members planned major student events and provided the ceremonial activities of the annual Commencement week. While literary societies no long exist, their influence on the college continues.

Tuesday, Feb. 6, through Saturday, March 31
“Three-Point Perspective: Conversations in Imagination, Legend and Science” by Jessica Scott-Felder
Richardson Family Art Gallery, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts

Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 1-5 p.m.; Thursday, extended hours to 9 p.m.; Sunday-Monday, closed. Admission is free. The Richardson Family Art Museum and Richardson Family Art Gallery are part of the Spartanburg ArtWalk held on the third Thursday of each month from 5 to 9 p.m.
Exhibition description: Starting with antique furniture in her grandmother’s living room to a story of Harriet Tubman using the stars to navigate from the south to migrate north, Jessica Scott-Felder, assistant professor of art and art history at Wofford, searched for legends involving the African diaspora, freedom and myth, and found one that originated closer to home – “The Legend of the Flying Africans.” The legend says that after surviving the nightmarish journey of the Middle Passage and slave market in Savannah, Georgia, a group of Igbo people rebelled against slave agents in route to St. Simons, Georgia. Oral histories say they turned into buzzards and flew to Africa. Many books reference these flying Africans and time travel. Scott-Felder’s works in the exhibition consist of drawings, digital collages and installations based on living rooms, American legends, theories of black hole dynamics and visuals from Afrofuturist writings. Sponsored by African/African-American Studies Program. Guests may join Scott-Felder in the gallery for open studio on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1 to 3 p.m. or by appointment beginning Feb. 16 through the end of the exhibition.
Special related events:
Wednesday, Feb. 14 – 7 p.m., Lecture and Panel Discussion, “The Future of Afrofuturism,” by Ingrid LaFleur (see bio in Feb. 14 event listing); panel discussion with Dr. Cassandra L. Jones (see bio in Feb. 14 event listing), Jerome Johnson Richardson Theatre, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
Thursday, Feb. 15 – 7 p.m., Opening Reception and Artist’s Talk, Richardson Family Art Gallery, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts