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February events at Wofford

Troubadour and Dunlap Series concerts, guest speakers highlight month

Chamber Music 382x255
The internationally acclaimed duo of Cho-Liang Lin, violin, and Jon Kimura Parker, piano, will perform Feb. 11 for the Dunlap Chamber Music Series.
2016-01-20

SPARTANBURG, S.C. – Free concerts of the Troubadour Series and the Dunlap Chamber Music Series, along with a variety of guest speakers, will highlight events at Wofford College in February.

All events are open to the public and are free of charge unless otherwise noted. Please check the online calendar at calendar.wofford.edu for frequent updates. For athletics events, please go to athletics.wofford.edu.

For more information, contact Laura Corbin at woffordnews@wofford.edu or 864-597-4180.

Monday, Feb. 1
Spring classes begin




Kathryn Umble 150widesmallerWednesday, Feb. 3
Troubadour Series: Guitar Duo Allant, guitar and flute
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Duo Allant is a world-class flute and guitar ensemble. Kathryn Thomas Umble (flute) and Francois Fowler (guitar) are recognized for the high level of musicianship and artistry that they bring to each performance. Known for connecting with audiences, Duo Allant has received glowing accolades for their exciting programs. Duo Allant’s innovative repertoire spans more than 400 years of music from Brazil, Japan, Canada, United States, Great Britain, Argentina and France. In addition, they are enthusiastic exponents of new music and have premiered works composed for their duo. Recent performances include the Ohio Cultural Alliance and Defiance Community Cultural Council Chamber Music Series, Cleveland Classical Guitar Society, Sunday Concert Series at Stambaugh Auditorium, Dayton Classical Guitar Society, Pittsburgh Music Academy, Fowler Francois 150 wideFaculty Artist Series at Youngstown State University and Penn State University (Esber Hall). Duo Allant is committed to reaching out to the community and the next generation of young musicians through university master classes and high school presentations. Umble and Fowler are faculty members at the Dana School of Music, Youngstown State University.

Monday, Feb. 8
Chinese New Year Celebration
5-7 p.m., Burwell Dining Hall

Chinese New Year, also referred to by the Chinese as Lunar New Year or Spring Festival, falls on Monday, Feb. 8. Being the most important and longest Chinese traditional holiday, it is celebrated all over the world wherever there is a Chinese community. The celebration will include Chinese food, performances and activities.

Mazower 150wideMonday, Feb. 8
Chapman Lecture in the Humanities: Mark Mazower, Columbia University, “The Crisis of the European Union in Historical Perspective”
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Mark Mazower, the Ira D. Wallach Professor of History at Columbia University, will present the first Chapman Lecture in the Humanities at Wofford. He is the author of numerous well-received books. His talk will be on “The Crisis of the European Union in Historical Perspective.” Mazower specializes in modern Greece, 20th century Europe and international history. His interests include the history of international norms and institutions, the history of Greek independence and the historical evolution of the Greek islands in the very long run. The Chapman Lecture in the Humanities was created through a revamping of the Chapman Program in the Humanities, which provided for the creation of two Chapman Professorships with those professors identifying and bringing to campus a noted visiting scholar.

Chamber Music 250 wideThursday, Feb. 11
Dunlap Chamber Music Series: Cho-Liang Lin, violin, and Jon Kimura Parker, piano
7 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

The internationally acclaimed duo of Cho-Liang Lin, violin, and Jon Kimura Parker, piano, will perform Mozart Sonata No. 5 in G Major, K. 379; Brahms Sonata No. 2 in A Major, Op. 100; and Beethoven Sonata in C minor, Op. 30 #2.

 




Carl Safina 250wideTuesday, Feb. 16
Guest speaker: Carl Safina, author, ecologist and PBS host, “Our Threatened Oceans”
11 a.m., McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building

WaterRock Institute presents Carl Safina, New York Times bestselling author, ecologist, and PBS host. Safina’s work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard and George Rabb medals. He has a Ph.D. in ecology from Rutgers University. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit organization The Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series “Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina.” His writing appears in the New York Times, Audubon, Orion and other periodicals and on the web at National Geographic News and Views, Huffington Post and CNN.com.

Wednesday, Feb. 17
African/African American Studies Program speaker: Daoud Haroon, jazz musician and ethnomusicologist
7-8:30 p.m., Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Daoud Haroon, 2014 United States Artist Fellow, trombonist, percussionist, ethnomusicologist, African and Middle East music scholar, will present a multimedia performance and lecture on the development of music in the African diaspora.

Schlingman 150wideWednesday, Feb. 17
Mathematics and Music: A Lecture by Dirk Schlingmann, University of South Carolina Upstate
7-9 p.m., Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

More than 100 guests attended the recent European Science Café lecture “Mathematics and Music” at the Goethe-Zentrum, where Dr. Dirk Schlingmann, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Carolina Upstate, provided a fascinating glimpse into the relationship between numbers and musical theory and explained in layman’s terms how mathematics can be helpful for the better understanding of the tone systems and for analyzing sound and creating music. He will repeat that presentation at Wofford. Before coming to USC Upstate in 2010, he was chair of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Eastern Kentucky University and chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Bethany College, Bethany, W.Va.

Thursday, Feb. 18
African/African American Studies Program speaker: Daoud Haroon, jazz musician and ethnomusicologist
11 a.m.-noon, Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Daoud Haroon, 2014 United States Artist Fellow, trombonist, percussionist, ethnomusicologist, African and Middle East music scholar, will present a multimedia performance and lecture on the development of music in the African diaspora.

Thursday, Feb. 18
Film Screening: “The Square”
7 p.m., Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

“The Square” is an award-winning behind-the-scenes look at the revolutionary events in Egypt between 2011 and 2013.

Tuesday, Feb. 23
Film: “Poverty, Inc.”
7-9 p.m., Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

“Poverty, Inc.,” a documentary on the business of foreign aid, has earned over 40 international film festival honors including a "Best of Fests" selection to IDFA Amsterdam, the biggest documentary festival in the world. See the trailer at http://www.povertyinc.org. An opportunity for discussion will follow the 91-minute film.

Thursday, Feb. 25
Panel Discussion: “Reflections on the Arab Spring”
11 a.m., McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building

A panel of faculty experts will reflect on the consequences of the 2011 Arab Spring in both the Middle East and the United States. Panelists will include Dr. William DeMars, professor and chair of the Department of Government, Dr. Philip Dorroll, assistant professor of religion; and Dr. Jedidiah Anderson, visiting assistant professor of modern languages, literatures and cultures.

Gallery Exhibitions:

Feb. 5 through April 5
Ephemeral Flights: Works by Jessica Elaine Blinkhorn
Martha Cloud Chapman Gallery, Campus Life Building

Ephemeral Flights juxtaposes the hyper-sexualized with the desexualized. The forms are paired with balloons, which function as a surrogate for life. The exhibit is intended to show that form does not matter and that socially integrated expectations can be damaging to the individual. Through Ephemeral Flights, visiting artist Jessica Elaine Blinkhorn shows that life is short and at times unfair, but it still offers opportunities to tell our story. The exhibit is designed in honor of the National Women’s History Month. An Artist Talk and Reception will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. March 9 in the Martha Cloud Chapman Gallery, and an Artist Lecture will be held at 4 p.m. March 10 in the Olin Teaching Theater in the Franklin W. Olin Building. For more about Blinkhorn and her art, go to http://jessicaelaineblinkhorn.weebly.com.

3d Wonders 250wideThrough Feb. 26
3D: Optic Wonders from Special Collections
Sandor Teszler Library Gallery, Sandor Teszler Library

Stereoscopes are making a comeback. Get ready to see the world as it appeared more than 100 years ago. The stereoscope, a small headset-viewer introduced to the public at the 1851 Crystal Palace Exhibition in London, mimics the brain’s ability to combine different perspectives from left and right eyes to perceive depth. Stereoscopes allow for 3D views that give the illusion of immersion in a scene. Viewers in the 19th and 20th centuries found themselves transported to faraway locales, luxurious palace interiors and modern industrial sites. In this exhibition, images from stereographs held in Special Collections are enlarged 1,200 percent and converted into anaglyph 3D, viewable with the red-and-blue-lensed glasses provided.