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Wofford announces October events

Exhibitions, speakers, performances scheduled
Forshee_Zane
Guitarist Zane Forshee will perform at Wofford on Thursday, Oct. 4.
2012-09-27

SPARTANBURG, S.C. – October will be filled with gallery exhibitions, special speakers and performances at Wofford College.

All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Please check our online calendar for frequent updates and additions at www.wofford.edu/calendar; for information, contact Laura Corbin at laura.corbin@wofford.edu or 864-597-4180. For information on athletics schedules, go to athletics.wofford.edu.

World Film Series: “The Skin I Live In”
Wednesday, Oct. 3 -- 3:30 and 7:30 p.m.
Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

Director: Pedro Almodóvar
Spain, 2011; 120 mins.
In Spanish (English subtitles)
After his wife’s disfigurement in a fiery car crash, brilliant plastic surgeon Robert Ledgard seeks to overcome his grief by inventing skin that is impervious to injury. After 12 years, he manages to cultivate skin that is sensitive to touch, but also serves as a real shield against all the aggressions, both external and internal, to our largest organ. However, his experiments on a living woman hasten his descent into madness.

Troubador Concert Series
Classical Guitarist Zane Forshee
Thursday, Oct. 4 -- 7 p.m.
Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Fingerstyle Guitar magazine describes Zane Forshee as “one of his generation’s finest guitarists.” Active both as a soloist and in chamber ensembles, Forshee has performed in recent concert engagements across North America, Europe and Asia, where his live performances have been noted for possessing “a beautiful ever-flow that held the audience captivated” (Retriever Weekly). Forshee has been featured at the Palacete de Amezúa (Madrid), the Joseph Joachim Konzertsaal (Berlin), the New York City Classical Guitar Society and the Chimei Museum (Taiwan). He has given collaborative performances with Opus 1 Contemporary Dance Company as well as solo and chamber recitals for the Philadelphia Classical Guitar Society, the Omaha Guitar Guild and the Endless Mountain Music Festival.
Forshee, winner of the first prize in the National Guitar Workshop International Solo Guitar Competition, top prize in the Montpelier Artist Recital Competition, and the first prize in the Baltimore Music Club String Competition, recently was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to Spain in support of his current recording project of contemporary Spanish works for solo guitar. In addition, he has been the recipient of two Peabody Institute Career Development Grants.

Chamber Music Series
Chamber Music Concert, String Quartet
Monday, Oct. 8 -- 7 p.m.
Leonard Auditorium,  Main Building

This Chamber Music Concert will feature David Coucheron, concertmaster of the Atlanta Symphony, violin; Christopher Rex, principal cellist of the Atlanta Symphony, cello; Julie Coucheron, piano; and Eun-Sun Lee, associate professor of music and director of the Chamber Players at Wofford, viola.

“Running as a Spiritual Exercise”
Speaker: Warren A. Kay, Merrimack College
Wednesday, Oct. 10 -- 4 p.m.
Room 213, Franklin W. Olin Building

Warren A. Kay, professor of religious studies at Merrimack College and author of “Running: The Sacred Art,” will speak. Sponsored by the Department of Philosophy.

International Poetry Event: “Native Tongues”
Thursday, Oct. 11 -- 4-5 p.m.
Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
A “Re:Thinking Education” Event

If poetry moves you and inspires you, come and join us for a reading of international poems! Student, faculty and staff members will read a favorite poem in its original language and present a brief introduction. Translations will be provided during the lecture.
The event will feature 10 to 12 poetry readings by different contributors, followed by a social hour during which attendees can further discuss the poems. Wofford students, faculty and staff who would like to read a poem may send an email, by Oct. 1, with the title of the poem and its author to Dr. Beate Brunow, Dr. Catherine Schmitz or Anna Zook.

“Thinking Like a River?” Environment Studies Symposium
“Thinking Like a River?”—A Roundtable Discussion & Workshop
Thursday, Oct. 11 -- 2:30-5:30 p.m.
Anna Todd Wofford Center
A “Re:Thinking Education” Event

Join the environmental studies faculty, staff, and students for two days of multidisciplinary inquiry into the relationship between concerned citizens and our rivers. Panelists include Susan Fox Rogers, author of “My Reach, A Hudson River Memoir”; Mike Freeman, author of “Drifing, Two Weeks on the Hudson”; Allison HedgeCoke, author of “Blood Run”; and David Furbish, hydrologist, Vanderbilt University. It will be moderated by John Lane, associate professor of environmental studies and director of Wofford’s Goodall Environmental Studies Center, and Kaye Savage, associate professor of environmental studies.

Lecture: “Artless Art History: Writing a History of Lost Art”
Speaker: Dr. Nancy Kay, Merrimack College
Thursday, Oct. 11 – 4 p.m.
Room, 221, Daniel Building
The Department of Art and Art History will discuss the research of art historian Nancy Kay into the lost sacred public sculptures of Antwerp. Kay received her Ph.D. from Brown University and teaches at Merrimack College. Coffee and other refreshments will be served.

“Thinking Like a River?” Environment Studies Symposium
“Confluence Thinking: A Science/Humanities Conversation”
Thursday, Oct. 11 -- 7 p.m.
Anna Todd Wofford Center

Panelists include Allison HedgeCoke and David Furbish moderated by Laura Barbas-Rhoden, associate professor of Spanish.

“Thinking Like a River?” Environment Studies Symposium
“The Hudson: One River, Two Voices”
Friday, Oct. 12 -- 7 p.m.
Hub-Bub Showroom- 149 S. Daniel Morgan Ave.

Panelists include Susan Fox Rogers and Mike Freeman; moderated by Gerald Thurmond, professor of sociology.

Troubadour Concert Series
Presti Guitar Trio
Friday, Oct. 12 -- 7 p.m.
Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

The Presti Guitar Trio is the first professional all-female guitar trio in the United States. Its name pays homage to the legendary Ida Presti, considered by many to be the greatest woman guitarist to date and one of the best performers in the history of the instrument. The trio is composed of Olga Amelkina-Vera, Valerie Hartzell and Lynn McGrath.
The trio’s most influential teachers include Manuel Barrueco, Robert Guthrie, Ako Ito, William Kanengiser, Alexander Lagoya, Matteo Mela, Pepe Romero, Douglas Rubio, James Smith, and many others who have given them advice and inspiration throughout the years. Among the three, there is an array of undergraduate and graduate degrees from such prominent music schools as the Peabody Conservatory, the University of North Texas and the University of Southern California.
Each member of the trio brings to Presti her own unique experiences and talents. Each is an accomplished performer in her own right, Hartzell and McGrath as soloists and Amelkina-Vera as a member of Kithara Duo. The trio’s performing careers have taken them all over Europe, the United States, Canada and South America. Among them is a composer, Amelkina-Vera, who has been inspired to contribute to the original guitar trio repertoire.

“Child of the Manhattan Atomic Project: Life Chances, Life Choices, and the Liberal Arts”
Speaker: Dr. David L. Warren, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
Monday, Oct. 15 – 4 p.m.
Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
A “Re:Thinking Education” Event
Dr. David L. Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities and former president of Ohio Wesleyan Universitywill speak on “Child of the Manhattan Atomic Project: Life Chances, Life Choices, and the Liberal Arts.”

“In Search of One Big Union: The Role of Folk Songs in the American Labor Movement”
Speaker: Dr. Corey Dolgon
Monday, Oct. 15 -- 7:30 p.m.
McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building
A “Re:Thinking Education” Event

Dr. Corey Dolgon, the “singing sociologist,” will deliver a singing lecture featuring some of the folk songs that were crucial to the American labor movement. Sponsored by the Cultural Affairs Committee and the Department of Sociology.

“What’s Justice Got to Do With It? Moving From Civic Engagement to Social Change”
Speaker: Dr. Corey Dolgon
Tuesday, Oct. 16 -- 11 am
Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building
A “Re:Thinking Education” Event

Dr. Corey Dolgon, author of “Social Problems: A Service Learning Approach,” will deliver a lecture on the social justice implications of civic engagement. Sponsored by the Cultural Affairs Committee and the Department of Sociology.

Lewis P. Jones Visiting Professor of History Lecture: “The Imperial President”
Speaker: Dr. Lloyd Gardner, Rutgers University
Tuesday, Oct. 16 -- 4 p.m.
Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
A “Re:Thinking Education” Event

Dr. Lloyd Gardner, professor emeritus at Rutgers University, is the Lewis P. Jones Visitng Professor of History for 2012-13. Gardner is a prominent scholar in the field of American diplomatic history. He will be speaking on “The Imperial President.”

World Film Series: “Vincent Wants to Sea”
Wednesday, Oct. 17 -- 3:30 & 7:30 p.m.
Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building
Director: Ralf Huettner
Germany, 2010; 96 mins.
In German (English subtitles)
Vincent suffers from Tourette’s Syndrome and, after his mother’s death, is institutionalized by his father. He ultimately escapes with two fellow patients -- an anorexic named Marie and the obsessive-compulsive Alexander. His mission is simple. He wants to bury his mother’s ashes in the seas off Italy, as was her dying wish. But to get there he and his friends steal their doctor’s car. If caught, it could all be quite an embarrassment for Vincent’s politician father. But the real problem is that Vincent and his friends threaten to drive each other crazy.

Kate Daniels, Poet
Wednesday, Oct. 17 -- 7:30 p.m.
McMillan Theater, Campus Life Building

Kate Daniels has published four volumes of poetry – “The White Wave,” “The Niobe Poems,” “Four Testimonies,” and, in 2010, “A Walk in Victoria’s Secret.” “The White Wave” received the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize for Poetry. Among her honors are a fellowship from what is now known as the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the James Dickey Prize for Poetry, the Louisiana Literature Prize for Poetry, and the 2011 Hanes Award for Poetry from the Fellowship of Southern Writers. She’s a professor of creative writing in the MFA program at Vanderbilt University.

Faculty Talk
“How to Carve a Buddhist Cave: Techniques of Rock-Cut Architecture”
Speaker: Dr. David Efurd, Art History
Thursday, Oct. 18 -- 4 p.m.
Burwell Building

In ancient India, pious Buddhists carved artificial cave monasteries directly into cliffs of stone. Populated by Buddhist monks and then abandoned temporarily, these remote caves persist due to their unusual method of manufacture. This talk will discuss the unique features of these rock-cut monuments, their manufacture, and how these fascinating monuments remain relevant to religious communities even today.

“Between God and Green: Evangelicals and Climate Change”
Speaker: Katharine K. Wilkinson, author and consultant with the Boston Consulting Group
Tuesday, Oct. 23 – 11 a.m.
Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

A conversation with Dr. Katharine K. Wilkinson on the subject of
evangelicals and the environment. Wilkinson is the author of Between God and
Green: How Evangelicals Are Cultivating a Middle Ground on Climate Change.” Wilkinson is a consultant at the Boston Consulting Group, where she specializes in organizational culture and behavior change. This event is co-sponsored by the Santee Cooper Lecture Series and South Carolina Interfaith Power and Light.
 

“Between God and Green: Evangelicals and Climate Change”
Speaker: Katharine K. Wilkinson, author and consultant with the Boston Consulting Group
Tuesday, Oct. 23 – 11 a.m.
Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

A conversation with Dr. Katharine K. Wilkinson on the subject of
evangelicals and the environment. Wilkinson is the author of “Between God and
Green: How Evangelicals Are Cultivating a Middle Ground on Climate Change.” Wilkinson is a consultant at the Boston Consulting Group, where she specializes in organizational culture and behavior change. This event is co-sponsored by the Santee Cooper Lecture Series and South Carolina Interfaith Power and Light.

Foothills Civil War Roundtable:
“Civil War Lawyers”
Speaker, Arthur T. Downey Monday, Oct. 29 -- 6-8 p.m.
Dinner: 6:30-7:15 p.m.,  Program: 7:15-8 p.m.
Montgomery Room,  Burwell Building

Arthur T. Downey brings to life the subject of his new book “Civil War Lawyers: Constitutional Questions, Courtroom Dramas, and the Men Behind Them.” Lawyers fought the Civil War before the first shot was fired on Fort Sumter. “Civil War Lawyers” explores crucial Supreme Court arguments, presidential decisions on constitutional issues, and tense courtroom dramas that took place during the Civil War period, where presidents struggled with the legalities of their actions. The 454-page book includes more than 100 biographies of Civil War lawyers, a look at the cases in which the lawyers crossed paths before the war, a detailed timeline of Civil War events, period photos and editorial cartoons. The book is published by the American Bar Association.
Downey has lectured at the Smithsonian Institution on Civil War legal issues and on Abraham Lincoln, and at American University’s Civil War Institute. His legal career spans both the public and private sectors. A former partner at Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP, he also served as vice president for government affairs in the Washington office of Baker Hughes. His public service includes several years as a member of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger’s National Security Council staff, and he served as assistant secretary of commerce for East-West trade. Downey has taught as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center.

Cost of dinner and program is $23; program only, $5. RSVP to Juanita Pesaro at pesarojb@wofford.edu or 864-597-4207.

Troubadour Concert Series
Classical Guitarist Stanley Alexandrowicz
Monday, Oct. 29 -- 7 p.m.
Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Classical guitarist Stanley Alexandrowicz is becoming internationally renowned for his virtuosic musicality, insightful interpretations and refined guitarism. In addition to his command of the instrument’s standard repertoire, he has premiered and commissioned more than 100 works by composers from Europe, Asia, North America, Cuba and South America. An Albany Records recording artist, Alexandrowicz’s recording of Dominick Argento’s “Postcard from Morocco” with the Curtis Opera recently was released (ALBANY TR1098-99). Forthcoming is a new CD of 20th and 21st century American guitar works (Ernst Bacon, Brian Fennelly, Kendall Kennison, Eric Sessler, Edward Green and Carlton Wilkinson). Alexandrowicz has been honored with the Ernst Bacon Society’s recording grant to commit to CD the premiere performances of the composer’s works for guitar. A scholar and specialist in the field of 19th century music, Alexandrowicz often features the virtuoso Romantic guitar repertoire in his concert programs, both in conjunction with the “music of our time” and in recitals devoted to the Romantic art.

World Film Series: “A Beautiful Life”
Wednesday, Oct. 31 -- 3:30 & 7:30 p.m.
Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building

Director: Andrew Lau
China, 2011; 124 mins.
In Mandarin (English subtitles)
She is a young, aggressive Beijing-based real estate agent from Hong Kong carrying on an affair with a married man who also happens to be her boss. He is an honest but way too rigid policeman in his midlife crisis. A chance encounter in a karaoke lounge leads to an unlikely friendship. She eventually runs off to Hong Kong after borrowing almost his entire savings. Several years have gone by before she realizes he is the one for her. She comes back to Beijing and finds her lover dying.

GALLERY EXHIBITIONS:
Legacy of Ancient Caves in India: Photographs by David Efurd
Through Oct. 28
Martha Cloud Chapman Gallery, Campus Life Building

In ancient India, monastic communities lived and worked in elaborate cave complexes. Dating as early as the 3rd century B.C., caves were hewn directly into mountainous outcroppings of stone, complete with architectural ornament and embellishments, with sculptures carved into solid rock and paintings covering their interior walls. These sites were abandoned with the decline of Buddhism in India. New communities and religious orders appropriated many of these cave complexes. Furthermore, India experienced a revival of Buddhism in the 20th century, and new generations of the Buddhist faithful flock to see ancient expressions of piety carved directly into the living rock. David Efurd, assistant professor of art history at Wofford, spent a year in India on a Fulbright-Hays Fellowship documenting and photographing ancient cave sites. He has returned to India several times to continue his research, often with camera in hand. Recently, he served as research fellow at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, on a project related to archaeology in the British Empire. This exhibition of photographs highlights how these ancient cave complexes negotiate the contemporary world and continue to serve diverse populations.

Film Art from Behind the Iron Curtain
Through Oct. 28
Sandor Teszler Library Gallery

This group of film posters from Eastern Europe showcases the graphic design and aesthetic of the culture of that region. Often, Western films and the American designs of the posters used to advertise and interpret the films undergo remarkable transformations when presented to their European audiences. The posters are on loan from the collection of Dr. Matthew Johnston of Spartanburg.

Photographs from Roxanna’s Farm
Through Oct. 30
Glass Case Galleries, Roger Milliken Science Center

Since 2008, when her doctor recommended more exercise, Roxanna Martin has roamed the 70 acres her family has owned for more than 100 years adjacent to the Tyger River near Cross Anchor, S.C. On her strolls with a digital camera, she’s accumulated more than 70,000 images from all seasons and in every kind of weather. She’s used those photographs to identify more than 300 species of plants and more than 30 species of butterflies along with numerous insects and spiders. Martin has developed expertise in natural history while consulting and collaborating with field biologists and botanists. In this exhibition she shares colorful photographs of some of the most interesting life-forms from her property.

A Sojourn in Africa: Recent Photographs by G.R. Davis
Oct. 16 - Nov. 2
Great Oaks Hall, Roger Milliken Science Center

In January 2012, G.R. Davis, professor of biology at Wofford, traveled to Zimbabwe and Kenya as co-leader of a Wofford Interim travel project titled “My Brothers and Sisters in Africa.” While teaching at Africa University in Old Mutare, Zimbabwe, from February until May, he continued to photograph the people, landscapes and wildlife he encountered there and on excursions to Rwanda and Botswana. This exhibition showcases the splendor of Africa typically seen on safaris to savannah habitats. It also includes images that reveal the abject human conditions prevalent in much of Africa which may provoke those with the resources to effect positive change in these developing nations.