envs3

The Tyson Family Lecture on the Preservation and Restoration of Southern Ecosystems

The Tyson Family Lecture on the Preservation and Restoration of Southern Ecosystems, established in 2012 by Dr. George Tyson, '72, Duke '77, within the purview of the Environmental Studies program, is an annual lectureship devoted to issues related to the preservation, restoration and sustainability of Southern ecosystems.  The speakers reflect the entire range of the multi-disciplinary approach of environmental studies and may include individuals from academia, business, industry, government, the arts or the non-profit sector.  These events are free and open to the public.

1st Annual Tyson Family Lecture - "Longleaf in the Long Run: Restoring the South's Richest Forest"

Keynote speaker: Rhett Johnson, founder and president emeritus of the Longleaf Alliance

November 1, 2012, 7:00pm - Olin Teaching Theater, F.W. Olin Building, Wofford College

Press Release in the Wofford Newsroom

See the Fierce Green Fire Newsletter article


2nd Annual Tyson Family Lecture - "Fire in the Southland: The Natural and Cultural Heritage of Woods-Fire in Southeastern North America"

Keynote speaker: Johnny Stowe - Outdoorsman, land manager, and SCDNR biologist

March 6, 2014, 7:00pm - Olin Teaching Theater, F.W. Olin Building, Wofford College

Press Release in the Wofford Newsroom

See the Fierce Green Fire Newsletter article

3rd Annual Tyson Family Lecture - "The Role of the Private Landowner in Conservation"

Keynote speaker: Julie Moore - US Fish & Wildlife Service, Branch of the Candidate Conservation & Communication in Endangered Species Program

March 26, 2015, 7:00pm - Olin Teaching Theater, F.W. Olin Building, Wofford College

Press Release in the Wofford Newsroom

See the Fierce Green Fire Newsletter article

4th Annual Tyson Family Lecture - "The Color of the Land - Sand County to Carolina Clay"

Keynote speaker: J. Drew Lanham, PhD - Alumni Distinguished Professor and Alumni Master Teacher at Clemson University in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Science

March 24th, 2016, 7:00pm - Olin Teaching Theater, F.W. Olin Building, Wofford College

Aldo Leopold wrote that “Conservation is a state of harmony between men [people] and land.”  While Leopold, a white Midwesterner came to ideas of the Land Ethic from travels in the American Southwest and in the idyll of restoring an old farm and a weekend cabin in Wisconsin, black southerners were less than one hundred years removed from the bonds of chattel slavery and mired in discrimination that has ultimately lead to loss of land/nature connection. With these losses has come a lack of participation by black Americans in conservation-related occupations and activities at extraordinarily low levels. What differential hearing of the “harmony” does the southern black experience bear on conservation going forward? How do we better understand and remedy the disconnections? Personal story is the start. This lecture series addresses ethnically-hued land ethic issues visited by both Dr. Lanham’s research and creative writing, providing a forum for discussion and exchange.

Press release in the Wofford Newsroom