arts3

World Film Series

The World Film Series is offered to the Wofford community in support of the College’s goals of developing intellectual curiosity and aesthetic sensitivity. Often these films are incorporated into course syllabi to enhance classroom learning and to increase cultural awareness. The Series is funded through the Wofford College Cultural Affairs Committee and the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

The films will be shown in widescreen DVD. Students are admitted free to all showings. There is no charge for films in DVD. All films are in the original language, with English subtitles when appropriate. The films are presented in the Teaching Theater of the F.W. Olin Building (Olin 101). All films are shown Wednesdays at 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., on the dates indicated. Some films may not be appropriate for younger viewers.

For more information regarding the World Film Series, email Patricia Nuriel at nurielpg@wofford.edu.


Fall 2015 Schedule

 

Tomboy
Wednesday, September 16th, 2015, 3:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Teaching Theater, F. W. Olin Building
Director: Céline Sciamma
France, 2011; 82 minutes
French with English subtitles

“From out lesbian director Celine Sciamma (Water Lilies), Tomboy tells the story of 10-year-old Laure (played by the amazing Zoe Heran) who moves to the suburbs and decides to pass as a boy amongst the pack of neighborhood kids. As “Mikael” she catches the attention of leader of the pack Lisa, who becomes smitten with her. At home with her parents and younger sister Jeanne, she is Laure; while hanging out with her new pals and girlfriend, she is Mikael. Finding resourceful ways to hide her true self, Laure takes advantage of her new identity, as if the end of the summer would never reveal her unsettling secret.” (www.kanopystreaming.com)

The film may not be appropriate for younger viewers. It may contain violence, nudity, sensuality, rough language, or contain or refer to alcohol/drug use.

Wild Tales
Wednesday, October 7th, 2015, 3:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Teaching Theater, F. W. Olin Building
Director: Damián Szifrón
Argentina, Spain, 2014; 122 minutes
Spanish with English subtitles

“Inequality, injustice and the demands of the world we live in cause stress and depression for many people. Some of them, however, explode. This is a movie about those people.
Vulnerable in the face of a reality that shifts and suddenly turns unpredictable, the characters of Wild Tales cross the thin line that divides civilization and barbarism. A lover's betrayal, a return to the repressed past and the violence woven into everyday encounters drive the characters to madness as they cede to the undeniable pleasure of losing control.” (sonyclassics.com)

The film may not be appropriate for younger viewers. It may contain violence, nudity, sensuality, rough language, or contain or refer to alcohol/drug use.

A Little Bit of Freedom
Wednesday, October 28th, 2015, 3:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Teaching Theater, F. W. Olin Building
Director: Yüksel Yavuz
Germany, 2003; 102 minutes
German, Kurdish, and Turkish with English subtitles

“In this spirited drama from Turkish-born, German-based filmmaker Yuksel Yavuz, our hero, Baran (Cagdas Bozkurt), is a Kurdish teen who makes bicycle deliveries for a kebab shop while trying to outwit the German authorities that denied him political asylum after leaving Turkey. He strikes up a friendship with another outsider, an illegal African immigrant who deals drugs, and becomes the object of desire for his employer's daughter. Neither help him maintain a low profile.” (www.facetsdvd.com)

The film may not be appropriate for younger viewers. It may contain violence, nudity, sensuality, rough language, or contain or refer to alcohol/drug use.

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress 
Wednesday, November 11th, 2015, 3:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Teaching Theater, F. W. Olin Building
Director: Sijie Dai
China, France, 2002; 110 minutes
Mandarin and French with English subtitles

“Dai Sijie directs Balzac et La Petite Tailleuse Chinoise (The Little Chinese Seamstress), a film adaptation of his own best-selling autobiographical novel. Set in China during the Cultural Revolution of the 1970s, the story follows Luo (Chen Kun) and Ma (Liu Ye), two young men from the city who are sent to a mountain village for a re-education in Maoist principles. They work with the peasants under the supervision of the village head man (Wang Shuangbao), who considers their violin to be a symbol of the bourgeoisie. Luo and Ma both fall in love with the little Chinese seamstress (Ziiou Xun), the daughter of the tailor (Chung Zhijun), and they read her forbidden works of Western literature including French writers Balzac and Dumas. The conclusion finds the two men reminincing about their experiences 30 years later. Balzac et La Petite Tailleuse Chinoise premiered at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival.” (www.therosegroup.org)

The film may not be appropriate for younger viewers. It may contain violence, nudity, sensuality, rough language, or contain or refer to alcohol/drug use.