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100.American Linden

Tilia americana


Tree Details

Hardiness zone:
3b to 8(9)
Height:
60 to 80 ft. but can grow to 100 ft. or more
Spread:
½ to 2/3’s the height of the tree
Habit:
Tall,stately tree with numerous, slender, low hung, spreading branches, pyramidal in youth; at maturity the lower drooping down then up, forming a deep, ovate, oblong, or somewhat rounded crown
Light:
Full sun or partial shade; not particularly air pollutant tolerant
Soil:
prefers deep, moist, fertile soils but will grow on drier, heavier soils and is often found in the wild on the slopes of hills, even in rocky places
Flowers:
Perfect, pale yellow, ½ inch wide, fragrant, borne in 5 to 10(15)-flowered, 2 to 3 inches wide, pendulous cymes in mid to late June; bees supposedly make the finest honey from these flowers
Fruit:
Not clearly defined, but termed a nut-like structure, 1/3 to ½ inch long, grayish tomentose, subglobose, of no ornamental value, thick-shelled, without ribs
Landscape use:
Limited because of size; too many superior European species which are more tolerant and ornamental. A handsome native tree which perhaps should be left in the woods.
History:
Canada to Virginia and Alabama, west to North Dakota, Kansas and Texas. Introduced 1752
Pests\Problems:
Foliage feeding insects can damage the trees as they strip them of almost all foliage
Significant Features:
The large leaves, often silver or grey-backed are prominent

 

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Arboretum Consultant

Michael A. Dirr

Dr. Michael A. Dirr is a horticulturist associated with the University of Georgia. Dr. Dirr has published over 300 scientific and popular publications and has authored seven books, including A Manual of Woody Landscape Plants: Their Identification, Ornamental Characteristics, Culture and Propagation and Uses. It has sold more than 250,000 copies.

Arboretum Consultant

Richard C. Webel

Richard C. Webel is managing director of Innocenti & Webel LLC, a renowned firm that specializes in architecture, landscape architecture and strategic planning. He collaborated on A Landscape of Continuity: The Practice of Innocenti & Webel, published by Harvard University in 1997. In addition to presenting lectures throughout the United States, he has also appeared on CNBC and CNN.